The Mass Image: A Social History of Photomechanical Reproduction in Victorian London by G. Beegan

The Mass Image: A Social History of Photomechanical Reproduction in Victorian London

byG. Beegan

Hardcover | January 9, 2008

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This book examines the emergence of mass reproduction and the origins of modern visual culture in the illustrated journalism of the 1890s. Focusing on the London print media of the 1890s but encompassing developments elsewhere in Europe and the United States,The Mass Image demonstrates that photomechanical reproduction, rather than bringing a neutrality and clarity to the printed image, produced an explosion of mixed and fragmented hand drawn and photographic imagery.

About The Author

GERRY BEEGAN is Assistant Professor in the Department of Visual Arts, Rutgers University.

Details & Specs

Title:The Mass Image: A Social History of Photomechanical Reproduction in Victorian LondonFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:January 9, 2008Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230553273

ISBN - 13:9780230553279

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Table of Contents

Introduction * Imaging the city: London and the Press in the 1890s * Wood Engraving Facsimile and Fragmentation * Process Reproduction and the Image Assembly Line * The Pictorial Magazine and the City of Consumption * The Illustration of the Everyday * The Photograph on the Page * Learning to Read the Halftone

Editorial Reviews

"Beegan offers a scrupulous historical account of one aspect of an otherwise well-documented visual culture. The technical and biographical information exhibited here ensures that this will be a valuable resource for anyone with an interest in the photographically reproduced image." -Matthew Rubery, University of Leeds, UK