The McGraw-Hill Guide: Writing for College, Writing for Life

Paperback | November 21, 2012

byDuane Roen, Gregory Glau, Barry Maid

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The McGraw-Hill Guide helps students set writing goals, use effective composing strategies to achieve those goals, and assess the effectiveness of their results.

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The McGraw-Hill Guide helps students set writing goals, use effective composing strategies to achieve those goals, and assess the effectiveness of their results.

Format:PaperbackDimensions:9.1 × 8.8 × 0.9 inPublished:November 21, 2012Publisher:McGraw-Hill EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0073405922

ISBN - 13:9780073405926

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Table of Contents

*New to this edition

Part One: Getting Started

1. Writing Goals and Objectives for College and for Life

  • Writing in the four areas of your life
  • Writing as a College Student
  • Writing as a Professional
  • Writing as a Citizen
  • Writing as a Family Member or Friend
  • Writing in the Four Areas of this Course
  • Learning Goals in this Course
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Rhetorical Analysis
  • Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
  • Writing Process
  • Knowledge of Convention
  • Composition in Electronic Environments
  • Becoming a Self-Reflective Writer
  • *Strategies for Success

2. Reading Critically for College and for Life

  • Why Read Critically? Integrating Sources into Your Own Writing
  • Using Prereading Strategies
  • Reading Actively
  • Annotating Effectively
  • Reading Visuals
  • Reading Web Sites
  • Using Postreading Strategies
  • Starting Your Writer's/Research Journal
  • Writing Effective Summaries
  • Synthesizing Information in Readings
  • Using Your Reading in Your Writing
  • Constructing a Rhetorical Analysis

3. Writing to Understand and Synthesize Texts [New Chapter]

  • Setting Your Goals
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Writing to Understand and Synthesize Texts
  • Writing Assignment Options
  • Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
  • Qualities of Effective Writing to Understand and Synthesize Texts
  • Reading to Learn about Understanding and Synthesizing Texts
    • *Danny Goldberg, Kill the Internet-and Other Anti-SOPA Myths (Editorial)
    • *Jimmy Wales and Kat Walsh, We Are the Media, and So Are You (Editorial)
    • *Margaret Munson, Critical Response to "We Are the Media, and So Are You" (Student Essay)
  • Writing Processes
  • Invention: Getting Started
  • Organizing Your Ideas and Details
  • Constructing a Complete Draft
  • Revising
  • Knowledge of Conventions
  • Editing
  • Genres, Documentation, and Format
  • A Writer Achieves Her Goal: Margaret Munson's Synthesis
    • *Margaret Munson, Protecting Creativity in a Wired World: Two Perspectives (Student Essay)
  • Self-Assessment: Reflecting on Your Goals

4. Writing to Discover and to Learn

  • Using Invention Strategies to Discover Ideas
  • Listing
  • Freewriting
  • Questioning
  • Answering the Questions Who? What? When? Why? and How?
  • Brainstorming
  • Clustering
  • Keeping Notebooks and Journals
  • Double-entry Notebook
  • Field Notebook
  • Rewriting Your Class Notes
  • Minute Paper
  • Muddiest Point
  • Preconception Check
  • Paraphrasing
  • Organizing and Synthesizing Information
  • Invented Interview/Unsent Letter
  • Using Charts and Visuals to Discover and to Learn
  • Clustering and Concept Mapping
  • Process Flowchart
  • Studying for Exams
  • Test Questions
  • Mnemonic Play

5. Writing to Share Experiences

  • Setting Your Goals
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Writing to Share Experiences
  • Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options
  • Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
  • Qualities of Effective Writing about Experiences
  • Reading to Learn about Writing That Shares Experiences
    • Tanya Barrientos, Se Habla Español (Memoir)
    • *Sherman Alexie, Superman and Me (Literacy Narrative) [print book only]
    • *Brad Whetstine, Augustinian Influences (Literacy Narrative) [ebook only]
    • Suki Kim, Facing Poverty with a Rich Girl's Habits (Memoir) [ebook only]
  • Writing Processes
  • Invention: Getting Started
  • Organizing Your Ideas and Details
  • Constructing a Complete Draft
  • Revising
  • Knowledge of Conventions
  • Editing
  • Genres, Documentation, and Format
  • A Writer Achieves Her Goal: Jessica Hemauer's Final Draft
  • Jessica Hemauer, Farm Girl (Student Essay)
  • Self-Assessment: Reflecting on Your Goals

6. Writing to Explore

  • Setting Your Goals for Exploratory Writing
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Writing to Explore in Your College Classes
  • Writing to Explore for Life
  • Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options
  • Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
  • Learning the Qualities of Effective Exploratory Writing
  • Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Texts That Explore
    • *Andrew Sullivan, Excerpt from "Why I Blog" (Reflective Essay)
    • *Owen Edwards, The Tuskegee Airmen Plane's Last Flight (Profile of an Event)
    • *Kiva Web site (Profile)
    • *Jesse Kornbluth Excerpt from "World's Best Blogger?" (Profile) [ebook only]
  • Writing Processes
  • Invention: Getting Started
  • Exploring Your Ideas with Research
  • Organizing Your Ideas and Details
  • Constructing a Complete Draft
  • Revising
  • Knowledge of Conventions
  • Editing
  • Genres, Documentation, and Format
  • A Writer Achieves His Goal: Rick Mohler's Final Draft
  • Rick Mohler, A Sporting Career? (Student Essay)
  • Self-Assessment: Reflecting on Your Goals

7. Writing to Inform [Note: Chapters 7-12 follow the same basic structure as Chapter 6.]

  • Carol Ezzell, Clocking Cultures (Informative Article)
  • *Dan Fletcher, A Brief History of Wikipedia (Informative Article)
  • *Tom Broadbent, Annotated Bibliography
  • Craig Broadbent Watch for the Blue Barrels (Student Essay)

8. Writing to Analyze

  • James M. Lang, Putting in the Hours (Opinion Piece)
  • *Susan Cain, The Power of Introverts (Analysis)
  • *Ashley TenBrink, A Rider Frozen in Motion (Visual Analysis)
  • Sarah Washington, Campus Parking: Love it or Leave It (Student Essay)

Part Three: Using What You've Learned to Write Arguments

9. Writing to Convince

  • *Marian Wright Edelman, Still Hungry in America (Opinion Piece)
  • Maureen Dowd, Our Own Warrior Princess (Editorial)
  • Allsup Organ Donation Poster (Advertisement)
  • Anne Applebaum, When Women Go to War (Editorial) [ebook only]
  • Santi DeRosa, The Objectification of Women: Whose Fault Is It? (Student Essay)

10. Writing to Evaluate

  • *Jonathan Liu, "The 5 Best Toys of All Time" (Opinion Piece)
  • *Roger Ebert, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2 (Review)
  • *Andrew O'Hehir, "'Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2': An Action-Packed Curtain Call" (Review)
  • Annlee Lawrence, Who Has the Better Burger? (Student Essay)

11. Writing to Explain Causes and Effects

  • Juan Williams, The Ruling That Changed America (Cause-and-Effect Essay)
  • Neal Gabler, How Urban Myths Reveal Society's Fears (Cause-and-Effect Essay)
  • Robert Reich The Real Reason Why Highway Deaths Are Down (Blog) [ebook only]
  • *Aprilyus, Anti-Smoking Poster (Cause-and-Effect Poster)
  • *Hanna Lake, Brothers, Brethren, and Kin: The Role of Family in the Lives of Harriet Jacobs and Black Hawk (Student Essay)

12. Writing to Solve Problems

  • *Anya Kamenetz, The Case for Girls (Proposal Essay)
  • *Virginia Heffernan, Education Needs a Digital-Age Upgrade (Opinion Piece)
  • Amy Baskin and Heather Fawcett, Request for a Work Schedule Change (Memo)
  • Michael Bérubé, How to End Grade Inflation (Op-Ed Article) [ebook only]
  • *Susan DeMedeiros, Staying ahead of Skimming Scams (Student Essay)

Part Four: Strategies for Effective Communication

13. Using Strategies That Guide Readers

  • Announcing a Thesis or Controlling Idea
  • Writing Paragraphs
  • Placement of Topic Sentences
  • Moving to a New Paragraph
  • Opening Paragraphs
  • Concluding Paragraphs
  • Using Cohesive Devices
  • Using Connective Words or Phrases
  • Using Word Repetition
  • Using Pronoun Reference
  • Using Transitional Sentences and Paragraphs
  • Using Headings
  • Writing Narratives
  • Narrating Single Events or a Series of Events
  • Narrating Processes
  • Writing Descriptions
  • Naming in Description
  • A Sensory Approach to Description
  • A Spatial Approach to Description
  • Writing Definitions
  • Kinds of Definitions
  • Writing Classifications
  • Writing about Comparisons and Contrasts
  • Approaches to Comparison and Contrast
  • Using Outlines and Maps to Organize Your Writing

14. Using Strategies for Argument

  • Argument and Persuasion
  • Rhetorical Appeals
  • Logical Appeals
  • Ethical Appeals
  • Emotional Appeals
  • The Rhetorical Triangle: Considering the Appeals Together
  • Three Approaches to Argument
  • Classical Strategies for Arguing
  • Parts of a Classical Argument
  • Example: The Classical Scheme in Action
    • David Wolman, Time to Cash Out: Why Paper Money Hurts the Economy
  • Toulmin Approach to Argument
  • Example: The Toulmin Model in Action
    • *Jordan Weissman, The Myth of Energy Independence: Why We Can't Drill Our Way to Oil Autonomy
  • Rogerian Strategies for Arguing
  • Example: Rogerian Strategies in Action
    • Rick Reilly, Nothing but Nets
  • Some Common Flaws in Arguments

15. Using Strategies for Collaboration

  • Working with Peers on Your Single-Authored Projects
  • Strategies for Working with Peers on Your Projects
  • Using Digital Tools for Peer Review
  • Working with Peers on Multiple-Authored Projects
  • Strategies for Working with Peers Effectively
  • Using Digital Tools to Facilitate Multiple-Authored Projects

16. Making Effective Oral Presentations

  • Developing Your Presentation
  • Establishing a Clear Structure
  • Considering Your Audience
  • Eliminating the Fear of Speaking in Public
  • Other Tips for Making Effective Oral Presentations
  • *Online Presentations

Part Five: Technologies for Effective Communication

17. Choosing a Medium, Genre, and Technology for Your Communication

  • Communication Technologies
  • Publishing Your Work
  • Selecting a Genre and Medium
  • Deciding on a Genre for Your Work
  • Deciding Whether to Use Print, Electronic, or Oral Media
  • Considering Design
  • Technologies for Computer-Mediated Communication
  • E-mail
  • Threaded Discussions
  • Synchronous Chat
  • Blogs
  • Wikis
  • Word-Processing Software
  • Peer-Review Applications
  • Graphics Software
  • Desktop Publishing Software
  • Presentation Software
  • Technologies for Constructing Web Pages

18. Communicating with Design and Visuals

  • Principles of Document Design
  • Proximity
  • Contrast
  • Alignment
  • Repetition (or Consistency)
  • Designing New Media
  • Common Kinds of Visual Texts
  • Tables
  • Bar and Line Graphs
  • Charts
  • Photographs
  • Drawings
  • Diagrams
  • Maps
  • Cartoons
  • Using Visuals Rhetorically
  • Considering Your Audience
  • Considering Your Purpose
  • Using Visuals Responsibly
  • Permissions
  • Distortions

Part Six: Using Research for Informed Communication

19. Finding and Evaluating Information

  • Conducting Effective Library and Web-Based Research: An Example
  • Library Research
  • Research on the Web
  • Selecting Sources
  • Books
  • Academic Journals
  • Newspapers
  • Popular Magazines
  • Trade or Commercial Magazines
  • Public Affairs Magazines
  • Specialty Magazines
  • The Internet
  • Evaluating Your Sources: Asking the Reporter's Questions
  • Who Is the Author?
  • What Is the Text About? What Is the Quality of the Information?
  • When Was the Text Published or the Web Site Last Updated?
  • Why Was This Information Published?
  • Where Was the Item Published?
  • How Accurate Is the Information in This Source
  • Field Research
  • Working with Human Participants
  • Informed Consent
  • Observations
  • Interviews
  • Surveys

20. Synthesizing and Documenting Sources

  • An Overview of Documentation
  • Plagiarism
  • Inadequate or Incorrect Citations
  • Patchwriting
  • Anti-plagiarism Software
  • Quotations
  • Paraphrases
  • Summaries
  • Syntheses
  • MLA Documentation Style
  • MLA Style: In-Text Citation
  • MLA Style: Constructing a List of Works Cited
  • MLA Style: Sample Student Paper
  • APA Documentation Style
  • APA Style: In-Text Citation
  • APA Style: Constructing a References List
  • APA Style: Sample Student Paper
  • Appendix A Constructing a Writing Portfolio
  • Appendix B Writing Effective Essay Examinations
  • Appendix C Standard Document Forms
  • eBook Chapters (Also available in Create)

21. Writing about Visual Texts [New Chapter]

  • Setting Your Goals
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Writing about Visual Texts
  • Writing Assignment Options
  • Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
  • Qualities of Effective Writing to Analyze Visuals
  • Reading to Learn about Analyzing Visual Texts
    • *Will Storey, Revisiting the Daisy Ad Revolution (Visual Analysis)
    • *Sebastian Smee, From Chaos, a Suspended Beauty (Visual Analysis)
  • Writing Processes
  • Invention: Getting Started
  • Organizing Your Ideas and Details
  • Constructing a Complete Draft
  • Revising
  • Knowledge of Conventions
  • Editing
  • Genres, Documentation, and Format
  • A Writer Achieves His Goal: Jayson Bailey's Visual Analysis
  • *Jayson Bailey, Riding a Harley Is an American Freedom (Student Essay)
  • Self-Assessment: Reflecting on Your Goals

22. Writing about Creative Works

  • Setting Your Goals
  • Rhetorical Knowledge
  • Writing about Creative Works
  • Writing to Learn about Literary Works
  • *Jamaica Kincaid, Girl
  • Amy Tan, Alien Relative
  • Writing Processes
  • Selecting a Creative Work to Write About
  • Recording Your Initial Responses
  • Finding a Feature to Analyze
  • Integrating Visuals When Writing about Creative Works
  • Organizing Your Ideas
  • Constructing a Full Draft
  • Revising
  • Knowledge of Conventions
  • Editing
  • Genres, Documentation, and Format
  • A Writer Achieves Her Goal: Katrina Montgomery's Final Draft
  • *Katrina Montgomery, Indirect Characterization in Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" (Student Essay)
  • Self-Assessment: Reflecting on Your Goals