The Meaning Of Sarkozy by Alain BadiouThe Meaning Of Sarkozy by Alain Badiou

The Meaning Of Sarkozy

byAlain BadiouTranslated byDavid Fernbach

Paperback | July 6, 2010

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In this incisive, acerbic work, Alain Badiou looks beyond the petty vulgarity of the French president to decipher the true significance of what he represents—a reactionary tradition that goes back more than a hundred years. To escape the malaise that has enveloped the Left since Sarkozy’s election, Badiou casts aside the slavish worship of electoral democracy and maps out a communist hypothesis that lays the basis for an emancipatory politics of the twenty-first century.
Alain Badiou teaches philosophy at the École normale supérieure and the Collège international de philosophie in Paris. In addition to several novels, plays and political essays, he has published a number of major philosophical works, including Theory of the Subject, Being and Event, Manifesto for Philosophy, and Gilles Deleuze. His rec...
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Title:The Meaning Of SarkozyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:128 pages, 7.75 × 5.18 × 0.39 inPublished:July 6, 2010Publisher:Verso BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1844676293

ISBN - 13:9781844676293

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Editorial Reviews

“Magnificently stirring ... a characteristically lucid polemic from a philosopher who is far from willing to abandon humanity to the vicissitudes of so-called global capitalism.”—Mark Fisher, Frieze“In the tradition of revolutionary pamphleteering.”—Michael Cronin, Irish Times“Compelling ... He deconstructs, with languid, sarcastic ferocity, the notion that ‘France chose Sarkozy’ ... a very French piece of political venom.”—Rafael Behr, The Observer“Heir to Jean-Paul Sartre and Louis Althusser ... a thundering, rallying tirade.”—Lucy Wadham, New Statesman“Incisive, incredibly readable and funny critique.”—Christopher Bickerton, Le Monde Diplomatique