The Mind and its Discontents by Grant GillettThe Mind and its Discontents by Grant Gillett

The Mind and its Discontents

byGrant Gillett

Paperback | May 16, 2009

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The first edition of The Mind and its Discontents was a powerful analysis of how, as a society, we view mental illness. In the ten years since the first edition, there has been growing interest in the philosophy of psychiatry, and a new edition of this text is more timely and important thanever. In The Mind and its Discontents, Grant Gillett argues that an understanding of mental illness requires more than just a study of biological models of mental processes and pathologies. As intensely social animals, he argues, we need to look for the causes of human mental disorders in our interactionswith others; in social rule-following and its role in the organization of mental content; in the power relations embedded within social structures and cultural norms; in the way that our mental life is inscribed by a cumulative life of encounters with others. Drawing upon work from within thephilosophy of mind, epistemology, post-modern continental philosophy, and philosophy of language, he tries to elucidate the nature of psychiatric phenomena involving disorders of thought, perception, emotion, moral sense, and action. Within this framework, a series of chapters analyse importantpsychiatric disorders such as depression, attention deficiency, autism, schizophrenia, and anorexia. Along the way, Gillett explores the nature of memory and identity; of hysteria and what constitutes rational behaviour; and of what causes us to label someone a psychopath or deviant. Updated, available in paperback, and more accessible than before, the new edition of this fascinating book will provide readers with important insights into the causes and nature of psychosis. In addition, Gillett's arguments have considerable implications for the way in which we understand andtreat people suffering from psychiatric disorders. The Mind and its Discontents will be read by researchers and postgraduate students in a range of academic areas, including psychiatry, bioethics, philosophy of mind, social theory, and clinical psychology. It will also be of considerable interest topractising psychiatrists.

About The Author

Grant Gillett is at the Dunedin Hospital and Otago Bioethics Centre at the University of Otago Medical School in Dunedin, New Zealand.
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Details & Specs

Title:The Mind and its DiscontentsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:420 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.03 inPublished:May 16, 2009Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199237549

ISBN - 13:9780199237548

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Table of Contents

1. Mind, brain and psychiatry2. Psychiatric categorization3. The treatment of aliens4. The depths of the self5. Thought in disarray6. The black dog and the muse7. Fidgets8. I and other robots9. Moral insanity and evil10. 'My name is Legion for we are many'11. I eat therefore I am not12. The meaning of hysteria13. The good that I would do14. Interrogating psychiatry and philosophyAppendices

Editorial Reviews

Review from previous edition: "Gillett's book is a serious and morally sensitive attempt to weld two approaches into a harmony, avoiding crude materialist reduction on the one hand and naive sentimentality, or an irrationalist slide into post-modernism, on the other... This is a work ofsignificance, and its comprehensiveness and the depth and subtlety of its analyses of central domains of psychiatry moves the growing literature in this genre one more step forward." --Rom Harre, Medical Humanities Review