The Monarch: Saving Our Most-loved Butterfly by Kylee BaumleThe Monarch: Saving Our Most-loved Butterfly by Kylee Baumle

The Monarch: Saving Our Most-loved Butterfly

byKylee Baumle

Hardcover | April 12, 2017

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Every fall, spectacular orange and black clouds of monarch butterflies fill the skies as they migrate from across North America to Central Mexico. West Coast populations make a similar though much shorter trip to coastal California. The National Wildlife Federation calls the monarch migration"one of the greatest natural phenomena in the insect world."Not long ago, monarchs numbered in the billions, but in the last 20 years their population has dropped by 90%, due to habitat loss from pesticides, modern farming practices, urban development and other human activity. An estimated one million acres of habitat are lost each year.

But today, an army of citizen scientists, students and gardeners is engaged in restoring this beloved pollinator's habitat - the wildflowers and milkweed and feeding corridors - so that one of nature's most beautiful creatures will still be there for generations to come. And it starts in our own backyards.

The Monarchshowcases this magnificent butterfly with eye-popping photos, fun facts about a monarch's life cycle, and things to know about the vital role that pollinators play in our ecosystem. Monarch enthusiast and nature blogger Kylee Baumle provides "action" projects for all ages, from planting milkweed and wildflowers to making butterfly watering stations...to volunteer activism.

Kylee Baumle is a citizen-scientist who participates in several programs that provide data to scientists studying monarchs (through MonarchWatch with the University of Kansas, and JourneyNorth, which reports migration sightings and roosts). Her rural Ohio garden is a Certified Monarch Waystation, a Certified Wildlife Habitat and a regi...
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Title:The Monarch: Saving Our Most-loved ButterflyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:160 pages, 8 × 8 × 0.98 inPublished:April 12, 2017Publisher:St. Lynn's PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1943366179

ISBN - 13:9781943366170

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Reviews

From the Author

I've been asked if it really matters if the monarch disappears, and whether or not we should care. The truth is that it does matter. There are reasons that we should care about this butterfly and they extend beyond the monarch itself. Perhaps the universe is using this beautiful creature to get our attention and draw us to more important matters. Maybe the monarch is merely the messenger in a world that is changing, and those changes aren't always beneficial to the earth and those of us who inhabit it. I remember as a child, seeing monarchs flying around my mother's garden and my grandmother's too - sometimes chasing them, though never catching them. To me they looked like animated jewelry among the static beauty of the colorful blooms. They seemed to be the perfect accessory to a well-dressed garden. Little did I know then that they had a greater purpose, as pollinators. And I was naively unaware of their astounding story of birth, growth and metamorphosis inside an emerald green chrysalis, hidden away among the plants. It wasn't until many years later - decades, actually - when I became what I call "a true gardener," that I learned of the even more amazing story behind the monarch. Its autumn journey south to Mexico, to a location that was known only to locals until 1975, earns it the distinction of having one of the longest insect migrations in the world.?There is much to learn about the monarch. As a backyard gardener, like many of us, I'm learning more all the time. But even the most basic facts and knowledge about the monarch and its life cycle can be enough to draw you into its world and capture your heart. You'll soon find yourself caring more than you ever thought possible about this summer resident of the U.S. and Canada that spends its winters in Mexico.

Read from the Book

Project: Make a butterfly watering stationMuch attention is paid to providing nectar sources for adult butterflies, but we know that they also need water and are drawn to locations that supply it. Providing an accessible source of water close to their preferred nectar sources will be just one more way to attract monarchs to your garden, patio, porch or balcony.You may have seen butterflies congregating at the edges of mud and water puddles to suck up water through their proboscises. They may be merely getting a drink, but some may also be doing so with another important purpose: In large groups, they are nearly always males, engaging in the act of "puddling." They're gathering salts and minerals from the water that will become incorporated into the spermatophore (the packet containing the sperm that they transfer to the female during mating). These nutrients will nourish the eggs, increasing the health and number of eggs that a female will lay.If you don't have a way to help the monarchs by growing nectar plants or milkweed, this simple watering station can be a welcome refreshment for them on a hot summer's day. ...

Editorial Reviews

Every fall, spectacular orange and black clouds of monarch butterflies fill the skies as they migrate from across North America to Central Mexico. West Coast populations make a similar though much shorter trip to coastal California. The National Wildlife Federation calls the monarch migration "one of the greatest natural phenomena in the insect world." Not long ago, monarchs numbered in the billions, but in the last 20 years their population has dropped by 90%, due to habitat loss from pesticides, modern farming practices, urban development and other human activity. An estimated one million acres of habitat are lost each year.But today, an army of citizen scientists, students and gardeners is engaged in restoring this beloved pollinator's habitat - the wildflowers and milkweed and feeding corridors - so that one of nature's most beautiful creatures will still be there for generations to come. And it starts in our own backyards. The Monarch showcases this magnificent butterfly with eye-popping photos, fun facts about a monarch's life cycle, and things to know about the vital role that pollinators play in our ecosystem. Monarch enthusiast and nature blogger Kylee Baumle provides "action" projects for all ages, from planting milkweed and wildflowers to making butterfly watering stations.to volunteer activism. I found Kylee Baumle's lovely new book, The Monarch, Saving Our Most Loved Butterfly a riveting tale of biology and conservation. The intricacies of the butterfly's life history, migration and overwintering biology are engagingly narrated and beautifully illustrated with high quality color images. Her advocacy of doing everything humanly possible to bring the monarch back from its recent precipitous decline due to human activities is expounded without being heavy handed. Rich in suggestions of what gardeners, citizen scientists, schoolteachers and students can do to help turn the decline around, the book will appeal widely to schools, conservation folks, general readers and to the gamut of people interested in submerging themselves in what she richly paints as a noble cause - saving our most loved butterfly.~ Lincoln P. Brower, Ph.D., Research Professor of Biology, Sweet Briar College