The Monk’s Haggadah: A Fifteenth-Century Illuminated Codex from the Monastery of Tegernsee…

Hardcover | February 6, 2015

EditorDavid Stern, Christoph Markschies, Sarit Shalev-Eyni

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In 1489, a magnificent illustrated Passover Haggadah was sent as a bequest to the Monastery of Saint Quirinus at Tegernsee in southern Germany. Shortly afterwards, the monastery’s librarian sent the book to a Dominican friar named Erhard von Pappenheim, a Hebraist and expert on Jewish practice, and asked him to write a prologue. In response, Erhard wrote a remarkable treatise that is arguably the earliest quasi-ethnographic account of Jewish practice in early modern Europe and an extraordinary window onto a fifteenth-century Christian’s perception of Jews and Judaism. The Monk’s Haggadah brings together a facsimile edition of the codex in color, a critical edition of the Latin text of Erhard’s prologue, an English translation of the Latin text, and a translation of the Hebrew text of the Haggadah. Additionally, the volume’s editors provide historical context, explore the codicology, illustration, and patronage of the volume, and describe its Christian theological background. An absolutely unique document, this Haggadah stands to change many long-held conceptions about Jewish-Christian relations in the late Middle Ages and early modernity.

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From the Publisher

In 1489, a magnificent illustrated Passover Haggadah was sent as a bequest to the Monastery of Saint Quirinus at Tegernsee in southern Germany. Shortly afterwards, the monastery’s librarian sent the book to a Dominican friar named Erhard von Pappenheim, a Hebraist and expert on Jewish practice, and asked him to write a prologue. In res...

David Stern is the Moritz and Josephine Berg Professor of Classical Hebrew Literature at the University of Pennsylvania. Christoph Markschies is the Chair of Ancient Christianity at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Sarit Shalev-Eyni is Professor of History of Art at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:296 pages, 10.3 × 7.35 × 0.35 inPublished:February 6, 2015Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271063998

ISBN - 13:9780271063997

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Customer Reviews of The Monk’s Haggadah: A Fifteenth-Century Illuminated Codex from the Monastery of Tegernsee, with a prologue by Friar Erh

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Contents

List of Illustrations

1. The Monk’s Haggadah (Munich Codex Hebrew 200): An Introduction

David Stern

2. The Making of the Codex: Scribal Work, Illumination, and Patronage

Sarit Shalev-Eyni

3. The History of the Codex and the Christian Theological Background of Erhard’s Prologue

Christoph Markschies

4. The Hebraist Background to Erhard’s Prologue

David Stern

5. Codicology and Description of the Manuscript

Sarit Shalev-Eyni

6. The Prologue to the Haggadah by Erhard von Pappenheim (Latin Text)

Edited by Christoph Markschies with Erik Koenke and Anna Rack-Teuteberg

7. The Prologue to the Haggadah by Erhard von Pappenheim (English Translation)

Translated by Erik Koenke with David Stern

8. The Passover Haggadah (in Codex Hebrew 200)

Translated by David Stern

Notes

Editorial Reviews

“In his moving and surprisingly gripping introduction to The Monk’s Haggadah, Harvard scholar David Stern describes the journey that he and his talented co-editors, Christoph Markschies and Sarit Shalev-Eyni, took in uncovering the mysteries of the manuscript and creating this handsome critical version. . . . Together with transcriptions and translations of the Prologue, text, and marginalia, the new book contains marvelous essays that make it a comprehensive account of the 500-year life of this mysterious manuscript.”—Philip Getz, Jewish Review of Books