The Morality of Private War: The Challenge of Private Military and Security Companies

Hardcover | June 29, 2014

byJames Pattison

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The increased use of private military and security companies (PMSCs) is often said to be one of the most significant changes to the military in recent times. The Morality of Private War: The Challenge of Private Military and Security Companies provides a detailed assessment of the moralarguments for and against the use of PMSCs. In doing so, it considers objections to private force at the employee, employer, and international levels. For instance, does the potential for private contractors to possess mercenary motives affect whether they can use military force? Does a stateabdicate an essential responsibility when it employs PMSCs? Is the use of PMSCs morally preferable to the alternatives, such as an all-volunteer force and a conscripted army? What are the effects of treating military services as a commodity for the governing rules of the international system? Overall, The Morality of Private War argues that private military force leads to not only contingent moral problems stemming from the lack of effective regulation, but also several deeper, more fundamental problems that mean that public force should be preferred. Nevertheless, it also argues that,despite these problems, PMSCs can sometimes (although rarely) be morally permissibly used. Ultimately, The Morality of Private War argues that the challenges posed by the use of PMSCs mean that we need to reconsider how military force ought to be organized and to reform our thinking about the ethicsof war and, in particular, Just War Theory.

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The increased use of private military and security companies (PMSCs) is often said to be one of the most significant changes to the military in recent times. The Morality of Private War: The Challenge of Private Military and Security Companies provides a detailed assessment of the moralarguments for and against the use of PMSCs. In doi...

Dr James Pattison's research interests include humanitarian intervention, the responsibility to protect, the ethics of war, and the increased use of private military and security companies. His first book, Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene?, published by Oxford University Press, was award...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pagesPublished:June 29, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199639701

ISBN - 13:9780199639700

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Table of Contents

1. The Challenge of PMSCsPart I: Individuals and Private Military Force2. The Right to be a Private Contractor3. The Restrictions on Private ContractorsPart II: Employing Private Military Force4. The Legitimacy of the State and Private Military and Security Companies5. The Alternative Arrangements of the MilitaryPart III: The Privatization of Military Force and the International System6. The Privatization of Military Force and the Constraints on War7. Private Military Force, Insecurity, and InstabilityPart IV: Implications and Reforms8. Private Military Force in Practice9. Reforms and Implications: Regulation, Reconstructing the Public Monopoly on Force, and Just War Theory10. Conclusion: Problems with the Market for ForceReferences