The Morphome Debate

Hardcover | August 20, 2016

EditorAna Luis, Ricardo Bermudez-Otero

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This volume surveys the current debate on the morphome, bringing together experts from different linguistic fields - morphology, phonology, semantics, typology, historical linguistics - and from different theoretical backgrounds, including both proponents and critics of autonomous morphology.The concept of the morphome is one of the most influential but contentious ideas in contemporary morphology. The term is typically used to denote a pattern of exponence lacking phonological, syntactic, or semantic motivation, and putative examples of morphomicity are frequently put forward asevidence for the existence of a purely morphological level of linguistic representation. Central to the volume is the need to attain a deeper understanding of morphomic patterns, developing stringent diagnostics of their existence, exploring the formal grammatical devices required to characterize them adequately, and assessing their implications for language acquisition and change. Theextensive empirical evidence is drawn from a wide range of languages, including Archi, German, Kayardild, Latin and its descendants, Russian, Sanskrit, Selkup, Ulwa, and American Sign Language. As the first book to examine morphomic patterns from such a diverse range of perspectives and on such a broad cross-linguistic basis, The Morphome Debate will be of interest to researchers of all theoretical persuasions in morphology and related linguistic disciplines.

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This volume surveys the current debate on the morphome, bringing together experts from different linguistic fields - morphology, phonology, semantics, typology, historical linguistics - and from different theoretical backgrounds, including both proponents and critics of autonomous morphology.The concept of the morphome is one of the mo...

Ana R. Luis is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Arts of the University of Coimbra. The central focus of her research has been Portuguese inflectional morphology and cliticization, with a special interest in the morphology of Portuguese contact varieties. She has published both as author and co-author on the morphology-syntax inter...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:384 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.1 inPublished:August 20, 2016Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198702108

ISBN - 13:9780198702108

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Table of Contents

Notes on contributorsAcknowledgementsAbbreviations1. Ana R. Luis and Ricardo Bermudez-Otero: IntroductionPart I: Morphomic or not? Diagnosing morphomicity2. Mark Aronoff: Unnatural kinds3. Martin Maiden: Some lessons from history: Morphomes in diachrony4. Greville G. Corbett: Morphomic splits5. Andrew Koontz-Garboden: Thoughts on diagnosing morphomicity: A case study from Ulwa6. Donca Steriade: The morphome vs. similarity-based syncretism: Latin t-stem derivativesPart II: Autonomous or not? Analysing morphomic patterns7. Gregory Stump: Morphomic categories and the realization of morphosyntactic properties8. Andrew Spencer: Stems, the morphome, and meaning-bearing inflection9. Erich R. Round: Kayardild inflectional morphotactics is morphomic10. Paolo Acquaviva: Morphomic stem extension and the German n-declension11. David Embick: On the distribution of stem alternants: Separation and its limitsRetrospect and prospect12. Ricardo Bermudez-Otero and Ana R. Luis: A view of the morphome debateReferencesIndex