The Mother And Other Unsavory Plays: Including The Shoemakers and They by Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz

The Mother And Other Unsavory Plays: Including The Shoemakers and They

byStanislaw Ignacy WitkiewiczEditorDaniel Gerould, C.S. Durer

Paperback | May 1, 2000

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Edited and translated by Daniel Gerould and C.S. Durer, foreword by Jan Kott. Painter, playwrights, novelist, aesthetician, philosopher, and expert on drugs, Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz - or Witkacy, as he called himself - remains Poland's outstanding figure in the arts between the two world wars. This volume brings together three of Witkiewicz's best works for the stage as well as a selection from his critical writing. The plays deal with the author's principal themes and obsessions: the dilemma of the artist in the twentieth century; the revolutions in science and politics; and the bankruptcy of all ideology, the decline of western civilization, and the coming of totalitarianism. Yet, far from being solemn or even serious in tone, these apocalyptic dramas are permeated with grotesque humor and characterized by a wild theatricality that particularly appeals to contemporary sensibility.

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Title:The Mother And Other Unsavory Plays: Including The Shoemakers and TheyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:7.7 × 5.2 × 0.53 inPublished:May 1, 2000Publisher:Applause Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1557831394

ISBN - 13:9781557831392

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Before Solidarity, before Walesa, before Flower Power and Timothy Leary and Peter Max, before the Cold War, before Sartre and Camus, there was Polish dramatist (and painter and philosopher and dandy and...) S.I. Witkiewicz. He not only anticipated it all, he was already howling his head off about it in the intense, explosive plays he wrote in Cracow between 1918 and 1925. In his extravagant persona anti outrageous dramas he was, as many have called him, truly the Polish Oscar Wilde.One could simply say that he was a genius before his time, except that, in truth, his time is now