The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes From Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant And Pizzeria by Nancy SilvertonThe Mozza Cookbook: Recipes From Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant And Pizzeria by Nancy Silverton

The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes From Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant And Pizzeria

byNancy Silverton, Matt Molina, Carolynn Carreno

Hardcover | September 27, 2011

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about

Winner of the  2014 James Beard Award for Outstanding Chef: the top chef in the country

A traditional Italian meal is one of the most comforting—and delicious—things that anyone can enjoy. Award-winning chef Nancy Silverton has elevated that experience to a whole new level at her Los Angeles restaurants Osteria Mozza and Pizzeria Mozza, co-owned with restaurateurs Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich. A reservation at Mozza has been the hottest ticket in town since the restaurants opened and diners have been lining up for their wildly popular dishes. Finally, in The Mozza Cookbook, Silverton is sharing these recipes with the rest of the world.

The original idea for Mozza came to Nancy at her summer home in Panicale, Italy. And that authentic Italian feel is carried throughout the book as we explore recipes from aperitivo to dolci that she would serve at her tavola at home. But do not confuse authentic with conventional! Under Silverton’s guidance, each bite is more exciting and delectable than the last, with recipes such as:
Fried Squash Blossoms with Ricotta
Buricotta with Braised Artichokes, Pine Nuts, Currants, and Mint Pesto
Mussels al Forno with Salsa Calabrese
Fennel Sausage, Panna, and Scallion Pizza
Fresh Ricotta and Egg Ravioli with Brown Butter
Grilled Quail Wrapped in Pancetta with Sage and Honey
Sautéed Cavolo Nero
Fritelle di Riso with Nocello-soaked Raisins and Banana Gelato
Olive Oil Gelato

In the book, Nancy guides you through all the varieties of cheese that she serves at the Mozzarella Bar in the Osteria. And you’ll find all the tricks you need to make homemade pastas, gelato, and pizzas that taste as if they were flown in directly from Italy. Silverton’s lively and encouraging voice and her comprehensive knowledge of the traditions behind this mouthwateringly decadent cuisine make her recipes—both familiar and intricate—easy to follow and hard to resist. It’s no wonder it is so difficult to get a table at Mozza—when you’re cooking these dishes there will be a line out your door as well.
Nancy Silverton is the co-owner of Osteria Mozza, Pizzeria Mozza, and Mozza2Go in Los Angeles, where she makes her home. She is the founder of the La Brea Bakery and formerly owned and operated Campanile (recipient of the 2001 James Beard Award for Best Restaurant). She is the author of A Twist of the Wrist, Nancy Silverton’s Sandwich ...
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Title:The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes From Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant And PizzeriaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:368 pages, 9.5 × 8.5 × 1.18 inPublished:September 27, 2011Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307272842

ISBN - 13:9780307272843

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Delicious Italian food The food looks amazing - the pizza recipes are very good.
Date published: 2017-06-01

Read from the Book

Chapter 1Apertivi and stuzzichiniOne of the things I enjoy most about my time in Italy is the rituals that punctuate every day-a particular favorite being cocktail hour. In my town, in the summertime, every afternoon at around six o'clock, the entire population descends on the one bar in town, Bar del Gallo, which everyone refers to as Aldo's, after its owner, for an aperitivo. In the hour or two between a postlunch nap and dinner, we sit at the tables that spill out from the bar into the piazza and enjoy relaxed conversation at a slow pace that I rarely experience here.The primary difference between Italian cocktail hour and American cocktail hour is that Italians don't eat. Italians might have seven salty peanuts at the bar, or they might indulge in a little cube of mortadella or mozzarella at a stand-up reception. The word for these little bites is stuzzichini, which comes from the word stuzzicare, meaning "to tease" or "to whet." The idea is to stimulate the appetite, not ruin it. And Italians would never, as we might, turn cocktail snacks into dinner.All that said, when we host private parties in the Primo Ministro room, the private dining room in the Osteria, or in the Scuola di Pizza, the special-events room attached to Mozza2Go, our customers request to start with a cocktail hour that includes tray-passed stuzzichini.But since Mozza is, as I've said, an Italian restaurant as seen through the eyes of American owners, the stuzzichini that we offer are a bit more substantial and flavorful than cubes of mortadella. We serve bite-size morsels that are easy to eat with a cocktail in one hand, such as crostini (pages 46-50) and Pancetta-wrapped Figs (page 54). You probably won't find anything so rich or filling at a cocktail hour in Italy, but we hope you enjoy these. And for you purists, forgive us the transgression, and enjoy your peanuts.Italians are deeply habitual when it comes to what they eat and drink and in what order. They would never, for instance, have a glass of wine after they've had a digestivo, or after-dinner drink. During cocktail hour, there are only a few acceptable options, the most common of which is a glass of Prosecco, or Italian sparkling wine. At Mozza, we greet guests for private parties with a glass of Prosecco and one of our sommeliers carries a magnum of Flor Prosecco around the dining room, refilling glasses and greeting regular customers with complimentary glasses. For those who prefer a cocktail, we offer some, also included in this chapter, conceived in an Italian spirit and executed in an American one.sugar plumMakes enough pomegranate reduction for 8 cocktailsfor the pomegranate reduction1⁄4 cup pomegranate juice1⁄4 cup sugarfor each cocktail2 ounces vodka (or gin)1 ounce fresh grapefruit juice1 1⁄2 teaspoons pomegranate reductionto make the pomegranate reduction, combine the pomegranate juice and sugar in a small saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar dissolves and the juice thickens to the consistency of thin syrup. Turn off the heat and set aside to cool the syrup to room temperature before using. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.To make each cocktail, combine the vodka, grapefruit juice, and pomegranate reduction in a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain the cocktail into a martini glass and serve.il postinoI don't rent out my house in Italy but I do let friends stay there. The "rent" that I charge is always the same: one book and one DVD. Our collection of both is pretty random, but thankfully someone at some time thought to bring the movie, Il Postino, one of my all-time favorites.Makes enough honey syrup for 8 cocktailsfor the honey syrup3 ounces mild-flavored honey, such as clover or wildflower honey2 tablespoons waterfor each cocktail1 ounce light rum1 tablespoon fresh lime juice1 tablespoon honey syrup3 ounces Prosecco, plus more as neededLime twist, for garnishsculaccionefor the simple syrup1⁄4 cup sugar1⁄4 cup waterfor each cocktail2 ounces Blanco tequila1 1⁄2 tablespoons fresh lime juice1 tablespoon fresh grapefruit juice1 tablespoon CampariDash of Angostura bitters1 tablespoon simple syrupLime wheel, for garnishMakes enough simple syrup for 4 to 6 cocktailsTo make the honey syrup, combine the honey and water in a small saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the honey is the consistency of thin syrup. Turn off the heat and set aside to cool the syrup to room temperature before using. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.To make each cocktail, combine the rum, lime juice, and honey syrup in a shaker with ice and shake well. Add the Prosecco and shake again. Strain the cocktail into a champagne flute, adding more Prosecco, if necessary, to fill the glass. Garnish with a lime twist and serve.To make the simple syrup, combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Turn off the heat and set aside to cool the syrup to room temperature. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.To make each cocktail, combine the tequila, lime juice, grapefruit juice, Campari, bitters, and simple syrup in a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Fill an old-fashioned glass with ice, strain the cocktail into the glass, and garnish with a lime wheel.meletti smashThis cocktail is named for the brand of amaro, or bitters, that we use to make it. You could use another bitters if you can't find Meletti.Makes enough for 4 to 6 cocktailsfor the simple syrup1⁄4 cup sugar1⁄4 cup waterfor each cocktail10 fresh mint leaves, plus 1 sprig for garnishDash of Fee Brothers mint bitters1 ounce Amaro Meletti1 ounce Black Seal rum11⁄2 tablespoons fresh lime juice1 tablespoon simple syrupTo make the simple syrup, combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Turn off the heat and set aside to cool the syrup to room temperature. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.To make each cocktail, use a wooden pestle or wooden spoon to muddle the mint leaves in an old-fashioned glass. Add the mint bitters and fill the glass with crushed ice. Combine the Amaro Meletti, rum, lime juice, and simple syrup in a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain the cocktail into the glass with the mint leaves, garnish with a spring of fresh mint, and serve.gordon's cupThis refreshing cocktail is a play on the traditional British cocktail, Pimm's Cup, made with gin instead of Pimm's.Makes enough simple syrup for 4 to 6 cocktailsfor the simple syrup1⁄4 cup sugar1⁄4 cup waterfor each cocktail9 thin slices cucumber (preferably Japanese cucumber)2 ounces Plymouth gin1 ounce fresh lime juice11⁄2 tablespoons simple syrupTo make the simple syrup, combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar is dissolved. Turn off the heat and set aside to cool the syrup to room temperature. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.To make each cocktail, use a wooden pestle or mortar to muddle 6 of the cucumber slices in an old-fashioned glass and fill the glass with ice cubes. Combine the gin, lime juice, and simple syrup in a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain the cocktail into the glass with the muddled cucumbers, garnish with the remaining cucumber slices, and serve.olives al fornoIn the Italian tradition of stuzzichini, I don't like to put out so many appetizers that my guests will ruin their appetites, but two things that I must serve whenever I entertain are roasted olives and toasted almonds tossed with olive oil and sea salt. These olives, which are tossed with citrus zest and garlic confit, are as beautiful as they are delicious. If we get an unusual olive variety, we might throw that in, but normally the combination we use is Lucques, Castelvetrano, Taggiasche (or Niçoise), and Picholine. You can use whatever combination of olives you want or have access to, as long as they're not the canned pitted things I grew up with. Also, keep in mind that it's ideal to have a variety of colors and sizes.You can prepare the olives up to a month in advance. Keep them in the refrigerator and roast them just before serving. If you are preparing them in advance, however, omit the garlic confit and garlic oil, as they will cause the olives to spoil more quickly. Prepare the olives with only the regular olive oil, and add the garlic and garlic oil up to several days before you are ready to roast them.Makes 1 quart of olives4 cups mixed unpitted olives (such as 1 cup each Lucques, Castelvetrano, Taggiasche or Niçoise, and Picholine), drained1 cup extra-virgin olive oilWide zest strips of 1 orange (peeled using a vegetable peeler)Wide zest strips of 1 lemon (peeled using a vegetable peeler)4 dried bay leaves1⁄2 cup fresh rosemary needlesGarlic Confit (recipe follows)1⁄4 cup balsamic vinegarSuggested wine pairing: Lambrusco Bianco I.G.T. (Emilia-Romagna)Combine the olives in a large bowl. Add the olive oil, orange rind, lemon rind, bay leaves, and rosemary. Add the Garlic Confit, including the chiles, and toss to combine.Adjust the oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 500ºF.Transfer the olives to a large shallow baking dish or several small shallow baking dishes. Place the baking dish on a baking sheet to catch any oil that bubbles over, and place the olives in the oven until the oil is sizzling and the olives are light golden brown on top, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the olives from the oven and drizzle the balsamic vinegar over them while they're still hot. Serve warm.garlic confit1 cup garlic cloves3 dried whole arbol chiles1⁄2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, or more as neededCombine the garlic, chiles, and olive oil in a small saucepan. Add enough oil to come three-fourths of the way up the sides of the garlic.Heat the oil over high heat until it just starts to bubble; you will start to hear the first sizzling noises and the first rapid bubble start to come up. Reduce the heat and simmer the garlic until it's deep golden brown, soft, buttery, and spreadable. Keep a careful eye on the garlic cloves and don't overcook them; they burn easily and will continue to brown as they cool. Set the garlic aside to cool to room temperature and use or transfer the contents of the saucepan to an airtight container and refrigerate for several days. Store the garlic cloves with the oil and chiles in the refrigerator in an airtight container for several days. To store the garlic for a longer period of time, add enough oil to completely cover the cloves and refrigerate them for up to several weeks.toasted almonds with sea saltThis isn't really a recipe, just a method for toasting almonds, but I felt that it was important to talk about almonds since, as I've said, they are my favorite thing to set out before a meal, not to mention to snack on while setting up at work or at home. Toasting the almonds enhances their flavor, and then tossing them with olive oil and sea salt turns them into something really worth eating. We call for toasted almonds in various recipes, such as Burrata with Asparagus, Brown Butter, Guanciale, and Almonds (page 78). Anytime we ask for toasted almonds I suggest you make more than what the recipes calls for, as I know you'll want some to snack on.To toast almonds, adjust the oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 325ºF. Spread the almonds on a baking sheet and toast for 12 to 15 minutes, or until they are fragrant and golden brown. Remove the almonds from the oven, drizzle them with the olive oil, sprinkle with sea salt, and toss to coat the almonds with the seasonings. Transfer the almonds to a pretty bowl, and serve.

Editorial Reviews

“This cookbook is freaking awesome. Silverton truly wants to share what she knows with her pupils. Usually, that knowledge is passed on to her restaurant chefs and cooks. But with The Mozza Cookbook, for a brief moment, it gets to be us.” —Jenn Garbee, LA Weekly “ . . . filled with beautiful rustic food photography and all the staple recipes.” —Kat Odell, Eater Los Angeles“I was struck by how fully and faithfully a chef's personality can translate from restaurant to page. [The book’s] lavish presentation of unusually lovely photographs seemed just right. Silverton takes full advantage of California's vivid produce. Her book, like her menus, casts the universe as a luxurious garden. . . . lyrical and nurturing.” —Frank Bruni, Food and Wine