The Muratorian Fragment and the Development of the Canon

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byGeoffrey Mark Hahneman

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The Muratorian Fragment, traditionally dated at the end of the second century, is by far the earliest known list of the books of the New Testament. It is therefore an important milestone in understanding the formation of the Christian canon of scriptures. The traditional date of thefragment, however, was questioned in 1973 by Albert C. Sundberg, Jr, in an article of the Harvard Theological Review that has since been generally ignored or dismissed. In this book, Dr Hahneman examines afresh the traditional dating of the fragment in a complete and extensive study that concurs with Sundberg's findings. Arguing for a later placing of the fragment, he shows that the entire history of the Christian Bible must be recast as a much longer and moregradual process. As a result, the decisive period of canonical history moves from the end of the second century into the midst of the fourth. As a decisive contribution to our understanding of the nature of the New Testament canon, this book will be of considerable importance and interest to NewTestament scholars and historians of the early Church alike.

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From Our Editors

The Muratorian Fragment, traditionally dated at the end of the second century, is the earliest known list of the books of the New Testament. It is therefore an important milestone in understanding the formation of the Christian Canon of Scriptures. The traditional date of the Fragment, however, was questioned in 1973 by Albert C. Sundb...

From the Publisher

The Muratorian Fragment, traditionally dated at the end of the second century, is by far the earliest known list of the books of the New Testament. It is therefore an important milestone in understanding the formation of the Christian canon of scriptures. The traditional date of thefragment, however, was questioned in 1973 by Albert ...

Geoffrey Mark Hahneman, Canon, the Cathedral Church of St Mark, Minneapolis.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:252 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.94 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198263414

ISBN - 13:9780198263418

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From Our Editors

The Muratorian Fragment, traditionally dated at the end of the second century, is the earliest known list of the books of the New Testament. It is therefore an important milestone in understanding the formation of the Christian Canon of Scriptures. The traditional date of the Fragment, however, was questioned in 1973 by Albert C. Sundberg, Jr., in an article of the Harvard Theological Review that has since been generally ignored or dismissed. In this book, Dr. Hahneman examines afresh the traditional dating of the Fragment in a complete and extensive study that concurs with Sundberg's findings. Arguing for a later placing of the Fragment, Dr. Hahneman shows that the entire history of the Christian Bible must be recast as a much longer and more gradual process. As a result, the decisive period of formation for the Christian Canon is found not at the end of the second century but in the midst of the fourth. As a substantial contribution to our understanding of the development of the New Testament Canon, this book will be of considerable importance and interest to Ne

Editorial Reviews

`In this new book, Geoffrey Mark Hahneman challenges the traditional second-century dating of the Muratorian Fragment, presenting a sustained and detailed argument that it was actually written in the fourth century, around 375. His persuasive argument is methodologically sound, and hisexamination of the relevant evidence is meticulous ... Hahneman's book is a superlative example of scholarly research and writing. Well organized, clearly written and thorough, it deals patiently with all the relevant evidence and converses with a wide range of scholarship ... Hahneman's findingsare important to anyone interested in understanding how the New Testament came together.'Bible Review, February 1994