The Muses of Resistance: Laboring-Class Womens Poetry in Britain, 1739-1796 by Donna LandryThe Muses of Resistance: Laboring-Class Womens Poetry in Britain, 1739-1796 by Donna Landry

The Muses of Resistance: Laboring-Class Womens Poetry in Britain, 1739-1796

byDonna Landry

Paperback | November 3, 2005

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In this original and challenging study, Donna Landry shows how an understanding of the remarkable but neglected careers of laboring-class women poets in the eighteenth century provokes a reassessment of our ideas concerning the literature of the period. Poets such as the washerwoman Mary Collier, the milkwoman Ann Yearsley, the domestic servants Mary Leapor and Elizabeth Hands, the dairywoman Jane Little, and the slave Phillis Wheatley can be seen employing various methods to adapt the conventions of polite verse for the purposes of social criticism. Historically important, technically impressive, and aesthetically innovative, the poetic achievements of these working class- women writers constitute an exciting literary discovery.
Title:The Muses of Resistance: Laboring-Class Womens Poetry in Britain, 1739-1796Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 9.72 × 6.85 × 0.71 inPublished:November 3, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021952

ISBN - 13:9780521021951

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Preface; 1. Sensibility and slavery: the discourse of working women's verse; 2. The resignation of Mary Collier: some problems in feminist literary history; 3. An English Sappho brilliant, young and dead? Mary Leapor laughs at the fathers; 4. The complex contradictions of Ann Yearsley: working-class writer, bourgeois subject?; 5. Laboring in pastures new: the two Elizabeths; 6. Other others: the marginality of cultural difference; 7. The 1790s and after: 'Revolutions that as yet have no model'.

Editorial Reviews

"For anyone interested in women's poetry, in class politics and art, or in eighteenth-century literature, this book is a real find." The Women's Review of Books