The Museum Of Intangible Things by Wendy WunderThe Museum Of Intangible Things by Wendy Wunder

The Museum Of Intangible Things

byWendy Wunder

Hardcover | April 10, 2014

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Loyalty. Envy. Obligation. Dreams. Disappointment. Fear. Negligence. Coping. Elation. Lust. Nature. Freedom. Heartbreak. Insouciance. Audacity. Gluttony. Belief. God. Karma. Knowing what you want (there is probably a French word for it). Saying Yes. Destiny. Truth. Devotion. Forgiveness. Life. Happiness (ever after).

Hannah and Zoe haven’t had much in their lives, but they’ve always had each other. So when Zoe tells Hannah she needs to get out of their down-and-out New Jersey town, they pile into Hannah’s beat-up old Le Mans and head west, putting everything—their deadbeat parents, their disappointing love lives, their inevitable enrollment at community college—behind them.

As they chase storms and make new friends, Zoe tells Hannah she wants more for her. She wants her to live bigger, dream grander, aim higher. And so Zoe begins teaching Hannah all about life’s intangible things, concepts sadly missing from her existence—things like audacity, insouciance, karma, and even happiness.

An unforgettable read from the acclaimed author of The Probability of Miracles, The Museum of Intangible Things sparkles with the humor and heartbreak of true friendship and first love.
Wendy Wunder is the author of The Probability of Miracles, which was called “beautiful” in a starred review from Kirkus and a “graceful balance of comedy and tragedy” by Publishers Weekly. When she’s not writing or spending time with her family, she teaches yoga in Boston. Like her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter at www.twitter.c...
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Title:The Museum Of Intangible ThingsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 8.5 × 5.87 × 1.1 inPublished:April 10, 2014Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1595145141

ISBN - 13:9781595145147

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Review from MajiBookshelf I had really high hopes for The Museum of Intangible Things because I loved Wendy Wunder's previous novel, The Probability of Miracles (Review here). First of all, she is blessed with beautiful book covers as well as very memorable book titles! The Museum of Intangible Things first got my attention because of the road trip aspect. You guys know how much I love road trips in my books! also, it is a best friend novel and I sometimes love my friendship books, void of romance. Overall, I did enjoy this book but I did have a couple of issues with it that didn't allow me to enjoy this novel as much as her previous one. This book fails to mention something very important, that it deals with a psychological disorder. One of the friends, Zoe, has bipolar syndrome. The road trip.. wasn't a fun road trip, it was about doing whatever Zoe wanted, and Hannah following her and hoping she doesn't drive off the edge this time. I do like her loyalty to her best friend, it is something I admire very much, but I hoped the way everything was handled had been handled differently. Also, the road trip? took over 100 pages for it to happen. You guys know how much I dislike when the synopsis mentions something that doesn't happen immediately in the book. I would have preferred not knowing they'll be going on a road trip because I was waiting for it as soon as I started reading. Also, the writing made me a bit uncomfortable, maybe it was how true it was to what teenagers think and go through nowadays but I just disliked the way these characters talked and thought.. it made me like them a bit less (am I making sense) but maybe this is just a case of "it's not you, it's me" where the author purposely did this to not romanticize teens' lives because I know we all want our YA characters to live happily ever after. However there are things I highly enjoyed in this novel and the first is the labeling of every chapter. Through the road trip, Zoe is teaching Hannah to ease up on life and to, for once, think about herself instead of her sorry excuse of a dad and barely present mother. I really liked the connection between the two girls and how even in the middle of all the crap they're going through, they still stuck by each other and wanted the best for each other (yes, even Zoe who tends to get her way with things). It was basically two girls against the world and it was refreshing to read YA contemporary novel with minimal romance (yes, there is a very diluted romance in there). I would definitely recommend it to contemporary fans who want to try something different.
Date published: 2014-05-01

Editorial Reviews

Praise for The Museum of Intangible Things“A crisp, beautifully crafted story of adventure, love, and the limits of friendship…” –Booklist (Starred Review)“A finely crafted blend of heartbreak and humor…” –Kirkus“Hannah’s fluid narration will keep the pages turning until the novel’s complex and bittersweet conclusion.” -SLJ “…beautifully explored…highly entertaining…Hand this to (girly) fans of Steven Chbosky.” -VOYA“A cast of well-rounded and memorable characters and a realistic perspective on mental illness make for a thought-provoking story.” –PW“Zoe is a complex character who in addition to being bipolar is also intelligent, loyal, and funny. Tragically, however, it’s Zoe’s illness that brings this outstanding novel—and an inspiring friendship—to a heartbreaking but inevitable conclusion.” –Horn Book"By building an engrossing story with likable characters around a set of poetic, even philosophical, concepts, Wunder invites readers to consider the intangibles in their own lives." -BCCB “Nobody writes true, messy, gorgeous friendship like Wendy Wunder. The Museum of Intangible Things is wrenching and real.”--Katie Cotugno, author of How to Love “The Museum of Intangible Things is the best kind of joyride: exhilarating and hilarious and full of heart. A must-read for anyone who has ever had - or longed for - a true best friend.” --Alexandra Coutts, author of Tumble and Fall