The Names They Gave Us by Emery LordThe Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord

The Names They Gave Us

byEmery Lord

Hardcover | May 16, 2017

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Lucy Hansson was ready for a perfect summer with her boyfriend, working at her childhood Bible camp on the lake and spending quality time with her parents. But when her mom's cancer reappears, Lucy falters-in her faith and in her ability to cope. When her boyfriend "pauses" their relationship and her summer job switches to a different camp-one for troubled kids-Lucy isn't sure how much more she can handle. Attempting to accept a new normal, Lucy slowly regains footing among her vibrant, diverse coworkers, Sundays with her mom, and a crush on a fellow counselor. But when long-hidden family secrets emerge, can Lucy set aside her problems and discover what grace really means?

Emotionally-charged and unforgettable, Emery Lord's storytelling shines with the promise of new love and true friendship, even in the face of life's biggest challenges.

Emery Lord is the author of Open Road Summer, The Start of Me and You, and When We Collided. She lives with her husband in Ohio, where they are owned by two rescue dogs.www.emerylord.com@emerylord
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Title:The Names They Gave UsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:400 pages, 8.42 × 5.85 × 1.53 inPublished:May 16, 2017Publisher:Bloomsbury USALanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1619639580

ISBN - 13:9781619639584

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from This Book Speaks to Me I feel like Emery Lord was very talented in capturing that essence of teen-going-into-adulthood. As one myself, I felt like SO MANY of the things addressed in this book - from Lucy's problems, her aspirations and hobbies, and even Lucy herself - were pretty reflective of my life. Or maybe that's only for me, but seeing the reviews, it was really good for other people as well. The characters were wonderfully developed, and the book was interesting overall, so don't worry about it being boring. I recommend reading it over the summer just because I like it when the books I read take place around the same time I'm reading it, it feels more immersive that way.
Date published: 2017-09-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful! There are no words about how deep and moving The Names They Gave Us is. I connected with Lucy as a character who also had a parent who has dealt with cancer. It did really make you feel what she was feeling when you are reading the book. Emery Lord is an amazing writer who knows how to engage her readers and this is no different than her past books. She depicted each relationship that Lucy engaged in and made it more special. Also the importance of family. You will definitely want tissues after reading it. I absolutely love this cover! It plays a key component in the book. Its eye catching! Lucy is the daughter of a Pastor and faith play a part in her life. But then her mother's cancer returns and now Lucy is on her own path. Even a pause relationship with her boyfriend. Eventually, she finds her own voice at a new camp her mother suggests and connecting with a diverse group. The romance between her and Henry was adorable from the beginning. I also loved the strong connection with her mother that it made you cry even more of what she is going through. The Names They Gave Us is book to definitely pick up. Until the very last page I was emotional and I felt that it could've been more! Reading this book made my heart full and made me think of my father. Even through the smile and tears I was happy by the end. Emery Lord is definitely an auto-buy author for me so I will be anticipating her next book!
Date published: 2017-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Refreshingly Cute Thoughts/ Opinions before Reading: 1) This is only my second Emery Lord book – the first being When We Collided that was NICE, but not all I expected it to be 2) I’m a little wary to be reading a book about faith and Christianity (I’m agnostic, and books that incorporate a lot of religion aren’t necessarily my favourite) 3) THIS COVER IS SO SO BEAUTIFUL THAT I HAVE TO OWN IT. Thoughts after reading the book: Short and Sweet: The Names They Gave Us surprised me in the best way – it had all the goodness of a summer romance, had just the right amount of family and faith, it handled all the issues it took on perfectly and was so real I couldn’t help but fall in love. · Lucy Esther had one of the best character growths I’ve seen in a while. She started off as your standard good girl, a little naïve, a little set in her ways (cue terms like *hippie camp* and *heathens*) but by the end of it, she’d definitely grown as a person and I loved witnessing it. · I LOVED LUCY’S FAMILY. I’m ALWAYS, ALWAYS complaining about how families just aren’t portrayed enough in YA contemporaries and how that makes them so unbelievable because HELLO – minors and high school? Lucy’s family was just the right amount of present, they were constantly in her thoughts and well, THEY MATTERED IN THIS BOOK. Thank you, Emery for bringing the perfect amount of family life to a YA Book. · SUMMER CAMP! I’ve never been at a month long camp, and I haven’t really thought about what it would be like, but I really truly loved the atmosphere of this camp. It had a bunch of kids with difficult lives trying to be kids and I loved everything about it! I loved the counselors and the banter they had among themselves, and the fact that these humans were real friends · FAITH. Or, more specifically, the way faith was handled. Like I said in my ‘before’ thoughts, I’m agnostic (not an atheist, not religious) and so books with their content as religion aren’t my favourite. For the first time, I not only didn’t mind it, I felt like it really tied the whole book together, making Lucy a character that was so much more life-like. A cute, refreshing, swoon-worthy, family filled summer read from one of the masters of contemporary young adult literature! 5 stars!
Date published: 2017-05-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Review from This is the Story of My(Reading) Life I like Emery. I really do. Her first two books are two of my all-time favourite contemps. I had some issues with her last book, but that was a me thing. Of course, I was dying to get my hands on The Names They Gave Us. Even though I had some reservations. I wasn't sure how well I'd connect, even like The Names They Gave Us. It is about the daughter of a pastor struggling with her faith. I am not a religious person and can find that when faith and religion are one of the main plot points I find myself unable to connect to the story. Or even find that it's too in my face. Clearly, I shouldn't doubt Emery and her story telling abilities. I may not have been able to relate to Lucy on those aspects of her life but that did not take away from the enjoyment of this book. The Names They Gave Us may not be my favourite of Emery's books but I do believe it's her strongest(to date). I had some misgivings about Lucy pretty much right away. You get this immediate impression of her; daughter of the pastor, clean cut, captain of the swim team, perfect upstanding boyfriend, hiding a few of her passions from her parents; she has a certain image to uphold. Or at least she thinks she does. My views on Lucy changed pretty quickly. She obviously had a lot of personal growth to go through. And it's not that she was a bad person, it's more that her true self had yet to have the time to shine through. Lucy was hidden behind her faith, the comfortable feeling of her trusting loyal boyfriend and captaining the swim team. The news of the return of her mother's cancer is ultimately the catalyst summer Lucy and all she'll learn. I loved Lucy for being curious and fiercely loyal. Even when shocking secrets are revealed and she has every right to be mad, Lucy remains unselfish and a decent person. Obviously, her mom's cancer is tragic, but I want to point out the bright light that came from it for Lucy(besides her boyfriend pausing them because yea dude is nice but Lucy needs more than nice), her spending the summer as a counsellor at the camp next door. This isn't her families bible camp. It's a camp for troubled kids. Lucy goes in with misgivings. It is a very different setting than her normal summer. But that's the point. Lucy needs to get out of her comfort zone. To realize how strong of a person she is. To form new friendships. To strengthen her bond with her parents. And the big one for Lucy, learning to trust her faith and to know that it will change and grow as she does. I feel like a lot of readers will find themselves relating to Lucy in one way. Even if you live different lifestyles, personal growth and change is always a scary thing when you're a teenager. Even more so in the throes of tragedy. Quick note on the cancer plotline; this is far from a "cancer book". Yes, Lucy mom's cancer is an element of the book but it is not the book. Far from it. The Names They Gave Us is a character driven novel, as you would assume a contemp would be. Lucy is our leading lady, but there is a whole slew of characters that I came to love as they dealt with their own baggage, well also helping Lucy along on her summer of growth. The power of friendship really shines through for Lucy when she starts to form relationships with some of her fellow counsellors. I don't think she realized how lonely she was until that point. The four main friendships she forms are some of the best moments in the book. As a group they're dynamic is amazing and fun. They have that familial bond that is missing in a lot of YA books out there. Lucy starts to fit seamlessly into the group. Forming those new relationships, with the group and some of the other kids at the camp is truly what helps Lucy in her journey. There is a romance; which is sweet and swoony and exactly what I wanted it to be. Never at any point does it take over the story. The romance is quite a few rungs down that plot ladder. Friends, family, faith and Lucy herself all squish up front and centre. Which is exactly how it should be for this story. I mean, I wouldn't mind more of Lucy and Jones in the future. Their relationship is super adorable. The whole always being yourself and honest with each other thing makes their lasting power as a couple believable. Even with them being so young. The Names They Gave Us is a personal growth story. Lucy starts out pretty subdued and nieve. She believes there is so much holding her back from learning to be herself. Lucy believes things about her parents just based on their faith and that is a dangerous thing. This is where Lucy's curiosity and her ability to learn and change shape her as a person. What you believe in people, how you think they'll react or think is second nature to us. Lucy realzing that her parent's faith or somebodies home life isn't a good enough reason to judge. Just like Lucy loving make-up or not knowing what her future holds should stop her exploring her life and options in the present. The Names They Gave Us is just a great YA contemp for anyone looking for a solid one sitting read; it's got the fun times, the sad times, family, friendship and a pinch of romance. A total win for me. P.S. I get what Emery was doing with that ending, but open endings are my enemy. Just be forewarned. I'd like to think that leaves room for a sequel. I know that is very very wishful dreaming on my part.
Date published: 2017-05-18

Editorial Reviews

"A natural successor to Sarah Dessen's The Truth about Forever. . . . Lord explores the hardships in both Lucy's life and the lives of the people around her without forgetting about the joys of ordinary life, summer love, and the pitfalls of growing up, all while offering a beautiful, all-too-rare portrait of a religion that accepts instead of condemns. Comfortingly familiar, vibrant, and, at times, wrenching, this belongs on all shelves." - starred review, Booklist"Lucy's story, as well as those of the other Daybreakers, will ring true for kids trying to find peace among their own broken pieces." - BCCB"This solid coming-of-age story with family drama and personal growth is a must-have for libraries with Jenny Han and Jennifer Niven fans." - School Library Journal"Lucy's problems are delivered with sensitivity and originality, plus romance, intrigue, and a little bit of mischief." - Kirkus Reviews"A vividly drawn novel of how we believe, how it changes, and how it changes us. In Lucy Hansson, Emery Lord gives us a narrator so vibrantly real that by the last chapter she felt like a friend I'd grown up with. Lucy's journey is as unforgettable as her voice." - Anna-Marie McLemore, author of Morris Award Finalist THE WEIGHT OF FEATHERS and National Book Award longlisted WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS"This is more than a love story. When We Collided carefully yet effortlessly puts mental illness in conversation with the beauty and struggle of adolescence. It is a book I wish could have written, but am so much better for having read." - Julie Murphy, #1 New York Times bestselling author of DUMPLIN' and SIDE EFFECTS MAY VARY on WHEN WE COLLIDED"Searingly honest, gut-wrenchingly authentic, and deeply romantic, When We Collided is a gift of a novel. It tackles tough topics with nuance, and will make readers both laugh and cry, sometimes within the span of a page." - Jasmine Warga, author of MY HEART AND OTHER BLACK HOLES on WHEN WE COLLIDED"A five-star must-read romance for older teens (and up) that will challenge readers toward a better understanding of a too-often marginalized and stigmatized segment of the population, When We Collided is an important book not only for this generation of teens, but those who've come before . . . and those who will come after." - USA Today on WHEN WE COLLIDED"An absolute tearjerker romance with a powerful message about weightier topics of grief and mental illness." - starred review, School Library Journal on WHEN WE COLLIDED"In sharp contrast to darker, more issue-driven YA books, this title keeps truer to the problems that most teens face. The protagonist's upbeat attitude will inspire readers to persevere even during the low points in life." - starred review, School Library Journal on THE START OF ME AND YOU"This is the teen world as it should be, full of good times and good friends to temper life's inevitable sorrows, big and small. Fans of Sarah Dessen and Deb Caletti will want to add Emery Lord to their summer reading list." - BCCB on THE START OF ME AND YOU"Lord offers a sweet story of love and loss. . . . The author is gentle with Paige as she struggles to redefine herself both in school and at home, as well as figure out who understands her best as she stumbles toward new romance." - Publishers Weekly on THE START OF ME AND YOU"Reads like an ode to unconditional love that will keep readers firmly believing in believing." - Booklist on OPEN ROAD SUMMER