The Namesake: A Novel by Jhumpa LahiriThe Namesake: A Novel by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Namesake: A Novel

byJhumpa Lahiri

Paperback | September 1, 2004

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Dazzling. . . An intimate, closely observed family portrait."- The New York Times

"Hugely appealing."- People Magazine

"An exquisitely detailed family saga."- Entertainment Weekly


Meet the Ganguli family, new arrivals from Calcutta, trying their best to become Americans even as they pine for home. The name they bestow on their firstborn, Gogol, betrays all the conflicts of honoring tradition in a new world-conflicts that will haunt Gogol on his own winding path through divided loyalties, comic detours, and wrenching love affairs.

In The Namesake, the Pulitzer Prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri brilliantly illuminates the immigrant experience and the tangled ties between generations.

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Keywords:&li&Immigrant Experience &li&Culture Clash &li&Displacement &li&Assimilation &li&Alienation
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Title:The Namesake: A NovelFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:304 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.68 inShipping dimensions:8.25 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:September 1, 2004Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0618485228

ISBN - 13:9780618485222

Appropriate for ages: 14

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Touching Touching novel that touches on immigrant and cultural issues.
Date published: 2018-07-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Great Coming of Age and Coming of Culture While a lot of this book is specific to the protagonists culture...its extremely relatable for anyone that has hit the point in their lives that they see themselves doing similar things their parents did. Most of us do in fact, become our parents and The Namesake provides a poignant look at how this transition and acceptance of family, culture, and identity forms each individual.
Date published: 2018-01-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent book I love this book. It is beautifully written - I had to stop several times to remind myself that this is fiction and not a memoir. I got sucked into the story from the first page. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-09-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from classic feels like an actual indian household
Date published: 2017-07-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great!!! This was a brilliant story. I would highly recommend it.
Date published: 2017-02-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Great read!!! Highly recommended.
Date published: 2017-02-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite books! My most prized possession. I read this book every year and it still speaks to me! Very relatable.
Date published: 2017-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this book I thought this was an incredible read. Really goes into detail about cultural differences and how a "name" can mean so much
Date published: 2016-12-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Very clipped weiting I found this book to be written in a way that was very clipped and mundane. Lots of detail that had no meaning or purpose. Very predictable. Not worth the time.
Date published: 2015-03-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Move this to the top of your reading list Because the movie for this book looked sooooo bad, I avoided reading this title for a while. But I trusted another bookworm’s recommendation and dug in. It was very worthwhile. It’s an easy read of complicated topics. The language is wonderful. And I particularly liked how it ended without everything being neatly tied up. Life never is.
Date published: 2014-11-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Namesake Very moving and touching. Lahiri has mastered the art of speaking into our lives and showing us where we are vulnerable. I must share this book with someone!
Date published: 2014-04-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A wonderful read! I can’t remember what movie I must constantly watch that has the trailer for the movie The Namesake, which is based upon Jhumpa Lahiri’s book of the same name, but every single time I saw the trailer, I wanted to see the movie. Naturally, I waited a few years, took the book out from the library, waited a few weeks, and now have finally finished the book. Seems like the natural progression, don’t you think? In the past, I never used to be one of those people who ensured they read the book before watching the movie, but now I make myself. I was quite pleased with Lahiri’s novel and couldn’t put it down–over 24 hours I had finished the whole thing; naturally, stopping to eat and sleep, and to get a tire fixed (which has nothing to do with anything–it was just an annoyance that took me away from reading this!). I don’t know what it is about books set in different places, or books that showcase a different culture, but I find them to be such an escape. Something so different than what I’m accustomed to in my everyday life. Though, don’t be fooled! The Namesake takes place mostly in America, but the smatterings of India throughout the novel as well as the culture the family tries to preserve in America is breathtaking. At just under 300 pages, Lahiri covers so much ground, which I’m impressed with; too many times I pick up a huge novel that is trying to do just the same thing Lahiri is and I find myself getting bored, putting it down, and reading something else in the interim. I’m happy to say I didn’t have that problem with this book. There may be a lot of narrative in this book, it is quite simple (though still beautiful and unpretentious), which makes for a very quick pace and I found I was swept into the story instantly–Lahiri has a great flow in this novel. I wouldn’t say there’s any main character of the book–the closest is probably Gogol–but, rather, the main “character” is the Ganguli family. It only seems natural because the Ganguli’s immediately gravitate towards more Bengalis in the neighbourhood in which they move, everyone being dubbed an honorary aunt, uncle, or cousin. Leaving the novel, I was left to think about what’s in a name? I think people take their names for granted–or even the naming of a child can be so frivolously done. The Namesake reminds us that the naming of a child is a big thing, that parents should pick a name that the child will be proud of, a name that tells a story, a name that brings them back to their history. It tells us that even though we may be so quick to try and run away from our heritage, after a few trips and life struggles, we might just want to come back to it.
Date published: 2012-01-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from "The man who gave you his name, from the man who gave you your name" Lahiri's words reach out to the reader in all its simplicity. Places and events are described delicately, the motivation and intents of the character are made known while sometimes left for one to interpret. More captivating are the anecdotes of memories that give the reader a greater recognition and empathy for the characters. I relate with Ashoke and Ashima being in a foreign laund and trying to assimilate, coming from a different background myself, while from an age-perspective understanding the "embarrassments" that the new generation of Gogol and Sonia go through in order to be seen a certain way. The book is about reconnecting with one's identity and heritage, while grasping that the past shapes us but does not, at least should not, hinder us for the future.
Date published: 2009-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the read The Namesake is about a young man's journey and shows that life is sometimes filled with irony.
Date published: 2008-06-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Challenging but worthwhile This book came highly recommended to me by my aunt-in-law. At first I was excited to read it, but as the book progressed I realized that it was going to be a challenging read. The story is engaging but frustrating at time. The author may have tried to engage too many characters and in the end, you lose sight of some of the story lines. That being said, it's beautifully written and a worthwhile read.
Date published: 2008-01-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic! I highly recommend this book. The characters are brilliantly written. You will be taken in by this touching family story. Watch for the movie in theatres!
Date published: 2006-12-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Brilliant, you won't be able to put it down ! The author gives such a vivid portrayal of her characters' lives, making you genuinely interested in what will happen to them along the journey. Aside from the novel accurately depicting the different challenges of emigrating, it leaves the reader with a different perspective on life. Once you're done with the novel, you start noticing details of day to day life that normally go missed. Highly recommend it ! It just flows effortlessly from beginning to end, leaving you said to let the characters go at the end.
Date published: 2006-02-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Quietly gripping from beginning to end. Just like each short story in Interpreter of Maladies, this novel is masterfully constructed and written. I was gripped right at the start by a unexpectedly shocking event, the fallout from which takes decades to subtly play out. The lead characters are so well rendered that I felt strongly attached to all of them, compelled to see them through the story and sorry to let them go on the final page. This book has a lot to say about the immigrant experience and that of their children. I highly recommend it.
Date published: 2005-05-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read I highly recommend this book. The story runs smoothly from beginning to end. Great writing. Very insightful regardless of your culture background.
Date published: 2005-02-01

From the Author

Dazzling. . . An intimate, closely observed family portrait."- The New York Times "Hugely appealing."- People Magazine "An exquisitely detailed family saga."- Entertainment Weekly Meet the Ganguli family, new arrivals from Calcutta, trying their best to become Americans even as they pine for home. The name they bestow on their firstborn, Gogol, betrays all the conflicts of honoring tradition in a new world-conflicts that will haunt Gogol on his own winding path through divided loyalties, comic detours, and wrenching love affairs. In The Namesake, the Pulitzer Prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri brilliantly illuminates the immigrant experience and the tangled ties between generations."

Table of Contents

Keywords:
&li&Immigrant Experience &li&Culture Clash &li&Displacement &li&Assimilation &li&Alienation

Editorial Reviews

Dazzling? An intimate, closely observed family portrait." The New York Times "Splendid." Time Magazine"Hugely appealing." People Magazine"What sets Lahiri apart is simple yet richly detailed writing that makes the heart ache as she meticulously unfolds the lives of her characters." USA Today A Best Book of the Year: New York Times, USA Today, Entertainment Weekly, Newsday, San Jose Mercury News.New York Magazine Book of the Year"An exquisitely detailed family saga? More than fulfills the promise of Lahiri's Pulitzer-winning collection." Entertainment Weekly "