The Nature Of The Gods

Paperback | October 30, 1972

byMarcus Tullius CiceroTranslated byHorace C. P. McgregorIntroduction byJ. M. Ross

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Towards the end of his life, Cicero turned away from his oratorical and political career and looked instead to matters of philosophy and religion. The dialogue The Nature of the Gods both explores his own views on these subjects, as a monotheist and member of the Academic School, and considers the opinion of other philosophical schools of the Hellenistic age through the figures of Velleius the Epicurean and Balbus the Stoic. Eloquent, clearly argued and surprisingly modern, it focuses upon a series of fundamental religious questions including: is there a God? If so, does he answer prayers, or intervene in human affairs? Does he know the future? Does morality need the support of religion? Profoundly influential on later thinkers, such as Saint Augustine and Thomas Aquinas, this is a fascinating consideration of fundamental issues of faith and philosophical thought.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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From Our Editors

 The nature of ethics and human existence never change. This is why a truly brilliant piece of intellectual writing such as The Nature of the Gods can never become outdated. The first century BC was witness to the genius of politician, orator and philosopher Cicero, who dared to wonder if there was a God and how this God conducted the ...

From the Publisher

Towards the end of his life, Cicero turned away from his oratorical and political career and looked instead to matters of philosophy and religion. The dialogue The Nature of the Gods both explores his own views on these subjects, as a monotheist and member of the Academic School, and considers the opinion of other philosophical schools...

From the Jacket

In De natura deorum, Cicero sets out the ancient Greeks’ conclusions about the existence and nature of deities and the extent of their involvement in human affairs.

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC), Roman orator and statesman, was born at Arpinum of a wealthy local family. By 70 BC he had established himself as the leading barrister in Rome, and was elected praetor in the year 66. Obtaining honours usually reserved for members of the aristocracy, Cicero was an uncompromising politician, and the...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 7.8 × 5.1 × 0.66 inPublished:October 30, 1972Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140442650

ISBN - 13:9780140442656

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

The Nature of the Gods Introduction
A Note on the Translation
Book I
Book II
Book III
Appendix I: Fragments
Appendix II: Imaginary Continuation of the Dialogue
List of Books
Glossary
Index

From Our Editors

 The nature of ethics and human existence never change. This is why a truly brilliant piece of intellectual writing such as The Nature of the Gods can never become outdated. The first century BC was witness to the genius of politician, orator and philosopher Cicero, who dared to wonder if there was a God and how this God conducted the affairs of mortals. Widely regarded by many to be a major influence on European philosophy, Cicero even developed a Latin vocabulary of abstract terms. Horace C.P. McGregor presents students of history and philosophy with a brilliantly eloquent translation while J. M. Ross provides a thoughtful introduction.