The New Country: A Social History of the American Frontier 1776-1890 by Richard A. BartlettThe New Country: A Social History of the American Frontier 1776-1890 by Richard A. Bartlett

The New Country: A Social History of the American Frontier 1776-1890

byRichard A. BartlettIntroduction byRichard A. Bartlett

Paperback | November 1, 1992

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From borax mule trains to the canoe stop that was Chicago in the 1830s, this book vividly recreated the tale of the westward movement of pioneers into the heartland of North America. With nearly a century separating historian Richard Bartlett from the end of the movement, Bartlett's broadperspective stresses the continuity and inevitability of this greatest element of America's Golden Age. The book focuses on the settlement of the country, the racial and ethnic composition of the people, agriculture, transportation, developments of the land, the growth of towns and cities, and thenature of frontier society as it brilliantly brings to life the frontier experience as lived by millions of Americans. Bartlett concludes that the pioneer's freedom from restrictions in a new country resulted in the unprecedented burst of energy that settled America in some 114 years.
Richard A. Bartlett is at Florida State University.
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Title:The New Country: A Social History of the American Frontier 1776-1890Format:PaperbackDimensions:512 pages, 7.99 × 5.31 × 0.98 inPublished:November 1, 1992Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195020219

ISBN - 13:9780195020212

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From Our Editors

The New Country is about humanity released from restrictions as never before, yet with the knowledge and technological skills of the nineteenth century.

Editorial Reviews

"Bartlett has an excellent eye and pen for the rich human diversity that made up the westward movement....His book charts the story in a way which recapture the thrill without exaggeration or sentimentality. It combines scholarship with imagination, the prose of the West with itspoetry."--The Economist