The New Woman in Uzbekistan: Islam, Modernity, and Unveiling under Communism by Marianne KampThe New Woman in Uzbekistan: Islam, Modernity, and Unveiling under Communism by Marianne Kamp

The New Woman in Uzbekistan: Islam, Modernity, and Unveiling under Communism

byMarianne Kamp

Paperback | January 31, 2008

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Winner of the Association of Women in Slavic Studies Heldt Prize

Winner of the Central Eurasian Studies Society History and Humanities Book Award

Honorable mention for the W. Bruce Lincoln Prize Book Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS)

This groundbreaking work in women's history explores the lives of Uzbek women, in their own voices and words, before and after the Russian Revolution of 1917. Drawing upon their oral histories and writings, Marianne Kamp reexamines the Soviet Hujum, the 1927 campaign in Soviet Central Asia to encourage mass unveiling as a path to social and intellectual "liberation." This engaging examination of changing Uzbek ideas about women in the early twentieth century reveals the complexities of a volatile time: why some Uzbek women chose to unveil, why many were forcibly unveiled, why a campaign for unveiling triggered massive violence against women, and how the national memory of this pivotal event remains contested today.

Marianne Kamp is assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.
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Title:The New Woman in Uzbekistan: Islam, Modernity, and Unveiling under CommunismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9 × 6.1 × 0.87 inPublished:January 31, 2008Publisher:University Of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295988193

ISBN - 13:9780295988191

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsA Note on Transliteration and AbbreviationsIntroduction1. Russian Colonialism in Turkestan and Bukhara2. Jadids and the Reform of Women3. The Revolution and Rights for Uzbek Women4. The Otin and the Soviet School5. New Women6. Unveiling before the Hujum7. The Hujum8. The Counter-Hujum: Terror and Veiling9. Continuity and Change in Uzbek Women's Lives10. ConclusionsNotesGlossaryBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Winner of the Association of Women in Slavic Studies Heldt PrizeWinner of the Central Eurasian Studies Society History and Humanities Book AwardHonorable mention for the W. Bruce Lincoln Prize Book Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS)This groundbreaking work in women's history explores the lives of Uzbek women, in their own voices and words, before and after the Russian Revolution of 1917. Drawing upon their oral histories and writings, Marianne Kamp reexamines the Soviet Hujum, the 1927 campaign in Soviet Central Asia to encourage mass unveiling as a path to social and intellectual "liberation." This engaging examination of changing Uzbek ideas about women in the early twentieth century reveals the complexities of a volatile time: why some Uzbek women chose to unveil, why many were forcibly unveiled, why a campaign for unveiling triggered massive violence against women, and how the national memory of this pivotal event remains contested today.Through Kamp's well?written account, we learn to view Central Asian women not just as victims?-of patriarchal societies and the Soviet coercive apparatus?-but also as agents in their own right. - Edward Schatz, University of Toronto