The Night Shift: Real Life In The Heart Of The ER

Hardcover | September 3, 2010

byBrian Goldman

not yet rated|write a review
Dr. Brian Goldman is both an emergency room physician at Mount Sinai and a prominent medical journalist. Never one to shy away from controversy, Goldman specializes in kicking open the doors to the medical establishment, revealing what really goes on behind the scenes -- and in the minds of doctors and nurses.

In The Night Shift, Goldman shares his experiences in the witching hours at Mount Sinai Hospital in downtown Toronto. We meet the kinds of patients who walk into an ER after midnight: late-night revellers injured on their way home after last call, teens assaulted in the streets by other teens and a woman who punches another woman out of jealousy over a man. But Goldman also reveals the emotional, heartbreaking side of everyday ER visits: adult children forced to make life and death decisions about critically ill parents, victims of sexual assault, and mentally ill and homeless patients looking for understanding and a quick fix in the twenty-four-hour waiting room. Written with Goldman’s trademark honesty and with surprising humour, The Night Shift is also a frank look at many issues facing the medical profession today, and offers a highly compelling inside view into an often shrouded world.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$22.49 online
$29.99 list price (save 25%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Dr. Brian Goldman is both an emergency room physician at Mount Sinai and a prominent medical journalist. Never one to shy away from controversy, Goldman specializes in kicking open the doors to the medical establishment, revealing what really goes on behind the scenes -- and in the minds of doctors and nurses. In The Night Shift, Goldm...

For more than twenty years, DR. BRIAN GOLDMAN has beena highly regarded emergency physician at Toronto’s Mount SinaiHospital, and he has parlayed his medical expertise into anaward-winning career in medical journalism. CBC Radio One’s“house doctor,” Dr. Goldman is also the host of the radio programWhite Coat, Black Art, which airs on C...

other books by Brian Goldman

The Secret Language Of Doctors
The Secret Language Of Doctors

Hardcover|May 25 2016

$10.00 online$29.99list price(save 66%)
Philosophical Pragmatism and International Relations: Essays for a Bold New World
Philosophical Pragmatism and International Relations: E...

Kobo ebook|May 23 2013

$61.59 online$79.99list price(save 23%)
see all books by Brian Goldman
Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 1 inPublished:September 3, 2010Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1554683912

ISBN - 13:9781554683918

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Night Shift: Real Life In The Heart Of The ER

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Non-Fiction at It's Best! Story Description: HarperCollins|September 3, 2010|Hardcover|ISBN: 978-1-55468-391-8 Dr. Brian Goldman is both an emergency room physician at Mount Sinai and a prominent medical journalist. Never one to shy away from controversy, Goldman specializes in kicking open the doors to the medical establishment revealing what really goes on behind the scenes – and in the minds of doctors and nurses. In The Night Shift, Goldman shares his experiences in the witching hours at Mount Sinai Hospital in downtown Toronto. We meet the kinds of patients who walk into an ER after midnight: late night revellers injured on their way home after last call, teens assaulted in the streets by other teens and a woman who punches another woman out of jealousy over a man. But Goldman also reveals the emotional, heartbreaking side of everyday ER visits: adult children forced to make life and death decisions about critically ill parents, victims of sexual assault, and mentally ill and homeless patients looking for understanding and a quick fix in the twenty-four hour waiting room. Written with Goldman’s trademark honesty and with surprising humour, The Night Shift is also a frank look at many issues facing the medical profession today, and offers a highly compelling inside view into an often shrouded world. My Review: This was an absolutely phenomenal book! Dr. Goldman blows the lid off what really goes on inside the Emergency Room for those inquiring minds who want to know. Goldman is frank, honest and doesn’t mince words about both the good and bad sides of his profession. The decisions, quick thinking and the speed at which these doctors and nurses often have to work is staggering. When you’re in the position of trying to save someone’s life you don’t have time to stand around and take a lot of time to think of your best options. At times, you just have to go with the flow so to speak. I feel terribly sorry for the mentally ill who are often misunderstood and don’t always get a sympathetic or understanding ear at the emergency department and Goldman admits that. Some just don’t have the patience to administer to the needs and requirements of these people in society which is sad. It must be very frustrating for the patient. The Night Shift was a riveting read and kept me glued from the first page to the last page and quite frankly, I didn’t want it to end. I wanted more stories. I’ll definitely be recommending this to friends and family.
Date published: 2012-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fascinating look in to a night-time ER Dr. Brian Goldman works the night shift in the ER at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto and has been doing so for more than 20 years. With another career as a radio broadcaster, Goldman uses his journalistic skills to take the reader through his 11pm to 7am shift and showcase some of the cases he has seen. This includes a woman who was in labour yet didn't realize she was pregnant, a suicidal elderly man, and a victim of a bar fight. This book shows you what kind of people and problems an ER sees, how doctors and nurses work together, and what doctors think about when they diagnose patients. Interestingly, Goldman views his job as a part time job. He works more than 8 hours, as he often stays past his shift to make sure he doesn't leave any patients on the next doctor's plate (a very important item for him as he mentions it multiple times throughout the book). He describes how fatigue can affect doctors and nurses who work these hours and yet he still has a job as a radio show host. One wonders how he finds the time and energy to do this. The most endearing part of this book, however, is how humane and honest Goldman comes across. You often think of doctors as being egotists that think they can never make a mistake or admit to making one. Goldman makes it clear that he is always afraid of making a mistake and hearing the three dreaded words "Do you remember" which usually implies a patient has died after being treated by the doctor. Goldman is also honest about how he selects cases not always based on how long the person has been waiting in the ER, but on how much the case interests him (let's hope that when I go to the ER, I'm considered interesting enough to be seen more quickly!). I notice with non-fiction reads I really enjoy that I commonly say "I'm reading this book about ..." and mention some interesting fact about the book. I've done that a couple times while reading The Night Shift. This book looks at not only a Toronto ER, but our overall health care system and how doctors perceive their roles. A very interesting read!
Date published: 2011-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The One Emergency Room Visit You Will Want To Make Hidden somewhere in the book's introduction is the sobering sentence, "Sooner or later most of you are going to need the services of someone like me." For me, that statement has been verified more than once. And so, I'm grateful to Dr. Goldman for sharing in such a clear and engaging format what it's like "on his side of the gurney". The E.R. experience is tense enough without the exaggeration we witness in TV dramas. Even though the night shift depicted in the book is really an elaborate composite, I would think it's a good a sample as any. Its presentation in the first person, as opposed to the common alternative (reporting/journalism style) lends it a much deeper, humane aspect. I particularly like the balanced and highly empathetic view Dr. Goldman takes in his book. He doesn't pander to gore and unlikely theatrics, and uses few literary mechanisms such as "little did I know". Humour and seriousness are well blended. He balances empathy and respect with reasoning and calculated choices. The story is easy to follow; it gets into medical details only to the extent they are needed to explain situations. And in more than one place the story surprisingly digs into Dr. Goldman's own personal history and sometimes painful experiences, which heighten my appreciation for his truly demanding work. I would recommend this book to anyone who has ever been or might be an E.R. patient. And if you have been a regular listener of his "White Coat, Black Art" show on CBC, let me assure you this book does not duplicate what you heard there. You might recognize a few details or a couple of stories, but this book is something else!)
Date published: 2010-10-12