The Noose Of Words: Readings of Desire, Violence and Language in Euripides Hippolytos by Barbara GoffThe Noose Of Words: Readings of Desire, Violence and Language in Euripides Hippolytos by Barbara Goff

The Noose Of Words: Readings of Desire, Violence and Language in Euripides Hippolytos

byBarbara Goff

Paperback | February 12, 2007

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This book is a new reading of Euripides' Hippolytos, a central play for the study of both Euripides and Greek tragedy. Professor Goff approaches the play through the techniques of modern literary criticism, including deconstruction and feminism, bringing new light to this influential text through her analysis of the play's language. She organizes her study around five critical issues: gender, desire, violence, language, and the status of poetry and drama. Throughout she takes care to situate the play within the historical and cultural context of fifth-century Athens. This provocative book will interest classicists and students of drama and literary theory; transliteration of Greek words and a glossary of key terms make it accessible to all.
Title:The Noose Of Words: Readings of Desire, Violence and Language in Euripides HippolytosFormat:PaperbackDimensions:156 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.35 inPublished:February 12, 2007Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521033233

ISBN - 13:9780521033237

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface; Acknowledgements; Glossary of Greek terms; 1. Speech and silence; 2. Desire; 3. Violence; 4. Imitation and authority; 5. The end; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Barbara Goff offers here a new reading of Euripedes' Hippolytos, one that builds on and significantly extends earlier work on this very important play. She skillfully combines the workings of contemporary literary theory (her most obvious debts are to René Girard and Jacques Derrida) with close philological analysis. The theory she deploys enables Goff to offer very convincing readings of vexed aspects of the play." Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz, American Journal of Philology