The Novel Cure: An A-z Of Literary Remedies

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The Novel Cure: An A-z Of Literary Remedies

by Ella Berthoud, Susan Elderkin

Penguin Canada | October 8, 2013 | Hardcover

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A novel is a story, a collection of experiences transmitted from the mind of one to the mind of another. It offers a way to unwind, a way to focus, a way to learn about life—dis­traction, entertainment, and diversion. But it can also be something much more powerful. When read at the right time in your life, a novel can—quite literally—change it.

The Novel Cure is a reminder of that power. To create this apothecary, the authors have trawled through two thousand years of literature for the most brilliant minds and engrossing reads. Structured like a reference book, it allows readers to simply look up their ailment, whether it be agoraphobia, boredom, or midlife crisis, then they are given the name of a novel to read as the antidote.

Bibliotherapy does not discriminate between pains of the body and pains of the heart. Aware that you’ve been cowardly? Pick up To Kill a Mockingbird for an injec­tion of courage. Experiencing a sudden, acute fear of death? Read One Hundred Years of Solitude for some perspective on the larger cycle of life. Stuck in a jam? Dip into Yann Martel’s Life of Pi. Whatever your condition, the prescription is simple: a novel (or two) to be read at regular intervals and in nice long chunks until you finish. Some treatments will lead to a complete cure. Others will only offer solace, showing you that you are not alone in your feelings. The Novel Cure is also peppered with useful lists and sidebars recommending the best post-breakup books, the top ten books to read in your twenties, the best novels on motherhood, and many more.

Brilliant in concept and deeply satisfying in execution, The Novel Cure belongs on everyone’s bookshelf. It will make even the most well-read fiction aficionados pick up a book they’ve never heard of or see familiar books with new eyes. Mostly, it will reaf­firm literature’s ability to distract and transport, to change the way we think about the world and our place in it.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 432 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 1.5 in

Published: October 8, 2013

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0670066567

ISBN - 13: 9780670066568

Found in: Reference and Language

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– More About This Product –

The Novel Cure: An A-z Of Literary Remedies

The Novel Cure: An A-z Of Literary Remedies

by Ella Berthoud, Susan Elderkin

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 432 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 1.5 in

Published: October 8, 2013

Publisher: Penguin Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0670066567

ISBN - 13: 9780670066568

From the Publisher

A novel is a story, a collection of experiences transmitted from the mind of one to the mind of another. It offers a way to unwind, a way to focus, a way to learn about life—dis­traction, entertainment, and diversion. But it can also be something much more powerful. When read at the right time in your life, a novel can—quite literally—change it.

The Novel Cure is a reminder of that power. To create this apothecary, the authors have trawled through two thousand years of literature for the most brilliant minds and engrossing reads. Structured like a reference book, it allows readers to simply look up their ailment, whether it be agoraphobia, boredom, or midlife crisis, then they are given the name of a novel to read as the antidote.

Bibliotherapy does not discriminate between pains of the body and pains of the heart. Aware that you’ve been cowardly? Pick up To Kill a Mockingbird for an injec­tion of courage. Experiencing a sudden, acute fear of death? Read One Hundred Years of Solitude for some perspective on the larger cycle of life. Stuck in a jam? Dip into Yann Martel’s Life of Pi. Whatever your condition, the prescription is simple: a novel (or two) to be read at regular intervals and in nice long chunks until you finish. Some treatments will lead to a complete cure. Others will only offer solace, showing you that you are not alone in your feelings. The Novel Cure is also peppered with useful lists and sidebars recommending the best post-breakup books, the top ten books to read in your twenties, the best novels on motherhood, and many more.

Brilliant in concept and deeply satisfying in execution, The Novel Cure belongs on everyone’s bookshelf. It will make even the most well-read fiction aficionados pick up a book they’ve never heard of or see familiar books with new eyes. Mostly, it will reaf­firm literature’s ability to distract and transport, to change the way we think about the world and our place in it.

About the Author

Susan Elderkin is one half of the team behind The Novel Cure: An A-Z of Literary Remedies. She and Ella Berthoud have been friends since university, and together run a bibliotherapy service out of The School of Life in London. Susan's first novel – Sunset over Chocolate Mountains was awarded a Betty Trask prize and The Voices was shortlisted for the Ondaatje Prize. In 2003 she was named by Granta as one of the Twenty Best Young British Novelists. Though British, she now lives in New Haven, Connecticut, with her husband and son.

Editorial Reviews

“Written in plain and inviting language, The Novel Cure is a charming addition to any library. Time spent leafing through its pages is inspiring—even therapeutic” - The Economist

“An exuberant pageant of literary fiction and a celebration of the possibilities of the novel.” - The Guardian