The odes and epodes of Horace; a metrical translation into English Volume 2

Paperback | May 5, 2014

byElton R. Smilie, Quintus Horatius Flaccus

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...Nor dragon-teeth, earth-sown In Thebes or Colchis, spring to armed men; "Merged in the deeps, more fair comes forth its star: Wrestle and win, it bears the winner down; And widowed wives shall tell Of victors vanquished on the fields it fought, f "No more to Carthage shall I send proud news; Dies, dies the power, the fortune, the renown Of the great Punic name; Dies hope itself, for Hasdrubal is slain. § "Evenit." Orelli, following Jahn, has "exiit"--a reading unsanctioned by more recent editors. t "Proelia conjugibus loquenda." Orelli considers that the line refers to the Roman wives speaking with exultation of the wars waged by their husbands. Ritter, on the other hand, powerfully supports the interpretation of Mitscherlich--viz., that the line refers to the widows of the slain. His argument seems to me convincing. Gens, quae cremato fortis ab Uio Jactata Tuscis aequoribus sacra, Natosque maturosque patres Pertulit Ausonias ad urbes, Duris ut ilex tonsa bipennibus Nigrae feraci frondis in Algido, Per damna, per caedes, ab ipso Ducit opes animumque ferro. Non Hydra secto corpore firmior Vinci dolentem crevit in Herculem, Monstrumve submisere Colchi Majus, Echioniaeve Thebae. Merses profundo, pulchrior evenit; Luctere, multa proruet integrum Cum laude victorem, geretque Proelia conjugibus loquenda.f Carthagini jam non ego nuntios Mittam superbos: occidit, occidit Spes omnis et fortuna nostri Nominis, Hasdrubale interempto.§ § Torrentius considers that here ends the speech attributed to Hannibal, and that in the last verse Horace speaks in his own person--an opinion which has had many followers, and is defended by Ritter. Orelli, supported by Macleane and Yonge, on the other hand, contends that the speech of Hannibal is...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1869 edition. Excerpt: ...Nor dragon-teeth, earth-sown In Thebes or Colchis, spring to armed men; "Merged in the deeps, more fair comes f...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:60 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.12 inPublished:May 5, 2014Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217415695

ISBN - 13:9780217415699

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