The Organisation of Mind

Paperback | April 10, 2011

byTim Shallice, Rick Cooper

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Brain imaging has been immensely valuable in showing us how the mind works. However, many of our ideas about how the mind works come from disciplines like experimental psychology, artificial intelligence and linguistics, which in their modern form date back to the computer revolution of the1940s, and are not strongly linked to the subdisciplines of biomedicine. Cognitive science and neuroscience thus have very separate intellectual roots, and very different styles. Unfortunately, these two areas of knowledge have not been well integrated as far as higher mental processes areconcerned. So how can these two be reconciled in order to develop a full understanding of the mind and brain?This is the focus of this landmark book from leaders in the field. Coming more than two decades after Shallice's classic 'From neuropsychology to mental structure', 'The Organisation of Mind' establishes a strong historical, empirical, and theoretical basis for cognitive neuroscience.The book starts by reviewing the history and intellectual roots of the field, looking at some of the researchers who guided and influenced it. The basic principles - theoretical and empirical and the inferential relation between them - are then considered with particular emphasis being placed oninferences to the organisation of the cognitive system from two empirical methodologies - neuropsychology and functional imaging. The core skeleton of the cognitive system is then analysed for the areas most critical for understanding rational thought. In the third section the components of simplecognitive acts are described, namely semantic processing, working memory, and cognitive operations. In the final section, more complex higher-level modulating processes are considered, including, supervisory processing, episodic memory, consciousness and problem-solving.This will be a seminal publication in the brain sciences - one that all students and researchers will have to read.

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Brain imaging has been immensely valuable in showing us how the mind works. However, many of our ideas about how the mind works come from disciplines like experimental psychology, artificial intelligence and linguistics, which in their modern form date back to the computer revolution of the1940s, and are not strongly linked to the subd...

Tim Shallice is a professor of neuropsychology and past director of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, part of University College London. He has been a professor at Cognitive Neuroscience Sector of SISSA since 1994. He has been influential in laying the foundations for the discipline of cognitive neuropsychology, by formalising ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:584 pagesPublished:April 10, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199579245

ISBN - 13:9780199579242

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Table of Contents

1. The Seeds are Sown2. Why Cognitive Neuroscience3. Bridging the Theoretical Gap: From the Brain to Cognitive Theory4. From Cognitive Impairment to Cognitive Models5. Inferences to the Functional Architecture from Functional Imaging6. On the Semantic Elements in Thought7. Short-Term Retention, Buffers, Priming and Working Memory8. On Operations9. On Supervisory Processes10. Higher Level Modulatory Processes: Episodic Memory11. Consciousness12. Thinking

Editorial Reviews

"The meticulous analyses of the methods and inferences used to draw conclusions about normal cognition from studies of abnormal cognition make it crucial as a contribution to cognitive neuropsychology." --Science