The Origins of War Prevention: The British Peace Movement and International Relations 1730-1854

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byMartin Ceadel

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This book makes an original contribution to international relations and British politics. It identifies for the first time the dominant pre-modern theory of international relations, which fatalistically assumed that war was beyond human control. It then shows how this theory was underminedfrom the 1730s onwards, with the consequence that a debate began about how best to prevent war in which a vocal minority argued that war as an institution for settling disputes could be abolished. Britain led the way in this repudiation of fatalism and exploration of pacific alternatives: itproduced the world's first peace movement (which appeared in the mid-1790s as a response to the French wars) and the first enduring national peace association (the Peace Society, founded in 1816 and active for nearly a century); and it was the first country to allow peace thinking (for example, asexpounded by Richard Cobden) to enter its political mainstream. This book, the first to make use of the Peace Society's records, fills a major gap in the historiography of British politics.

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From Our Editors

This book makes an original contribution to international relations and British politics. It identifies for the first time the dominant pre-modern theory of international relations, which fatalistically assumed that war was beyond human control. It then shows how this theory was undermined from the 1730s onwards, with the consequence t...

From the Publisher

This book makes an original contribution to international relations and British politics. It identifies for the first time the dominant pre-modern theory of international relations, which fatalistically assumed that war was beyond human control. It then shows how this theory was underminedfrom the 1730s onwards, with the consequence ...

From the Jacket

This book makes an original contribution to international relations and British politics. It identifies for the first time the dominant pre-modern theory of international relations, which fatalistically assumed that war was beyond human control. It then shows how this theory was undermined from the 1730s onwards, with the consequence t...

Martin Ceadel is a Fellow and Tutor in Politics at New College, Oxford.

other books by Martin Ceadel

Semi-Detached Idealists: The British Peace Movement and International Relations, 1854-1945
Semi-Detached Idealists: The British Peace Movement and...

Hardcover|Dec 15 2000

$368.69 online$510.00list price(save 27%)
Format:HardcoverDimensions:600 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.54 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198226748

ISBN - 13:9780198226741

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From Our Editors

This book makes an original contribution to international relations and British politics. It identifies for the first time the dominant pre-modern theory of international relations, which fatalistically assumed that war was beyond human control. It then shows how this theory was undermined from the 1730s onwards, with the consequence that a debate began about how best to prevent war, in which a vocal minority argued that war as an institution for settling disputes could be abolished. Britain led the way in this repudiation of fatalism and exploration of pacific alternatives: it produced the world's first peace movement (which appeared in the mid-1790s as a response to the French wars) and the first enduring national peace association (the Peace Society, founded in 1816 and active for nearly a century); and it was the first country to allow peace thinking (for example, as expounded by Richard Cobden) to enter its political mainstream.

Editorial Reviews

No recent British writer has done more than Martin Ceadel to clarify concepts and terminology in our thinking about war and peace...His latest, and most ambitious, book unites in one volume both the "theoretical" and the "historical" approaches which have been characteristic of his work...This gives his chapters on the decades after 1816 an authority and comprehensiveness achieved by no previous writer. Taken in the round...this book is not likely to be surpassed. - Keith Robbins. War in History 1999.