The Other Roots: Wandering Origins in <i>Roots of Brazil</i> and the Impasses of Modernity in Ibero-America by Pedro Meira MonteiroThe Other Roots: Wandering Origins in <i>Roots of Brazil</i> and the Impasses of Modernity in Ibero-America by Pedro Meira Monteiro

The Other Roots: Wandering Origins in <i>Roots of Brazil</i> and the Impasses of Modernity in Ibero…

byPedro Meira MonteiroTranslated byFlora Thomson-deveaux

Paperback | October 30, 2017

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First published in 1936, the classic work Roots of Brazil by Sérgio Buarque de Holanda presented an analysis of why and how a European culture flourished in a large tropical environment that was totally foreign to its traditions, and the manner and consequences of this development. In The Other Roots, Pedro Meira Monteiro contends that Roots of Brazil is an essential work for understanding Brazil and the current impasses of politics in Latin America.
Pedro Meira Monteiro is professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Princeton University. He is the author, editor, and co-editor of numerous books, including a critical edition of Raízes do Brasil.
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Title:The Other Roots: Wandering Origins in <i>Roots of Brazil</i> and the Impasses of Modernity in Ibero…Format:PaperbackDimensions:318 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.67 inPublished:October 30, 2017Publisher:Longleaf Services Univ of Notre Dame du LacLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0268102341

ISBN - 13:9780268102340

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Editorial Reviews

"The Other Roots: Wandering Origins in Roots of Brazil and the Impasses of Modernity in Ibero-America is a highly original and rich study of the main topics and contributions of Sérgio Buarque de Holanda's Roots of Brazil. It promotes an essential task, one that not many people undertake: trying to think about Brazil and its culture through its complex links with different intellectual traditions. This explicit, multicultural approach to Brazil is, in my view, a very necessary move for Brazilian studies today." —Norman Valencia, Claremont McKenna College