The Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media

Paperback | June 15, 2013

EditorRobert Y. Shapiro, Lawrence R. Jacobs

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Public opinion and the media form the foundation of the United States' representative democracy. They are the subject of enormous scrutiny by scholars, pundits, and ordinary citizens. This Oxford Handbook takes on the 'big questions' about public opinion and the media - both empirical andnormative - focusing on current debates and social scientific research. Bringing together the thinking of a team of leading academic experts, its chapters provide a cutting assessment of contemporary research on public opinion, the media, and their interconnections. Emphasizing changes in the massmedia and communications technology - the vast number of cable channels, websites and blogs, and the new social media, which are changing how news about political life is collected and conveyed - they describe the evolving information interdependence of the media and public opinion. In addition, the volume reviews the wide range of influences on public opinion, including the processes by which information communicated through the media can affect the public. It describes what has been learned from the latest research in psychology, genetics, and studies of the impact of gender,race and ethnicity, economic status, education and sophistication, religion, and generational change on a wide range of political attitudes and perceptions. The Handbook includes extensive discussion of how public opinion and mass media coverage are studied through survey research and increasinglythrough experiments using the latest technological advances.The Oxford Handbooks of American Politics are a set of reference books offering authoritative and engaging critical overviews of the state of scholarship on American politics. Each volume focuses on a particular aspect of the field. The project is under the General Editorship of George C. EdwardsIII, and distinguished specialists in their respective fields edit each volume. The Handbooks aim not just to report on the discipline, but also to shape it as scholars critically assess the scholarship on a topic and propose directions in which it needs to move. The series is an indispensablereference for anyone working in American politics.

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Public opinion and the media form the foundation of the United States' representative democracy. They are the subject of enormous scrutiny by scholars, pundits, and ordinary citizens. This Oxford Handbook takes on the 'big questions' about public opinion and the media - both empirical andnormative - focusing on current debates and soci...

Robert Y. Shapiro (Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1982) is a professor and former chair of the Department of Political Science at Columbia University, and he served as acting director of Columbia's Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy during 2008-2009. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sc...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:816 pagesPublished:June 15, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199673020

ISBN - 13:9780199673025

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Table of Contents

Part I: Introduction1. Lawrence R. Jacobs and Robert Y. Shapiro: Informational Interdependence: Public Opinion and the Media in the New Communications Era2. W. Russell Neuman, Bruce Bimber, and Matthew Hindman: TheInternet and Four Dimensions of Citizenship3. Brian J. Gaines and James H. Kuklinski: A Possible Next Frontier in Political Communication Research: Merging the Old with the NewPart II: The MediaFoundations4. Michael Schudson: Tocqueville's Interesting Error: On Journalism and Democracy5. Katherine Ann Brown and Todd Gitlin: Partisans, Watchdog, and Entertainers: The Press for Democracy and Its Limits6. Doris A. Graber and Gregory G. Holyk: The News Industry7. Marion R. Just: What's Newsworthy: A View from the 21st Century8. Matthew A. Baum and Angela Jamison: Soft News and The Four Oprah EffectsMeasurement and Method9. Jennifer Jerit and Jason Barabas: Exposure Measures and Content Analysis in Media Effects Studies10. Lynn Vavreck and Shanto Iyengar: The Future of Political Communication Research: Online Panels and ExperimentationEffects11. James Druckman and Dennis Chong: Public-Elite Interactions: Puzzles in Search of Researchers12. Thomas E. Nelson: Issue Framing13. Bradford H. Bishop and D. Sunshine Hillygus: Campaigning, Debating, Advertising14. Patricia Moy and Muzammil M. Hussain: Media Influences on Political Trust and Engagement15. Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Bruce W. Hardy: The Effect of Media on Public Knowledge16. W. Lance Bennett: News Polls: Constructing an Engaged PublicPart III: Public OpinionFoundations17. John G. Gunnell: Democracy and the Concept of Public Opinion18. Michael X. Delli Carpini: Constructing Public Opinion: A Brief History of Survey Research19. Susan Herbst: Critical Perspectives on Public OpinionMeasurement20. Michael Traugott: The Accuracy of Opinion Polling and Its Relation to Its Future21. Adam J. Berinsky: Representative Sampling and Survey Non-Response22. George Franklin Bishop: Instrument Design: Question Form, Wording and Context EffectsMicro-Level Frameworks23. Charles S. Taber: Political Cognition and Public Opinion24. Ted Brader, George E. Marcus, and Kristyn L. Miller: Emotion and Public Opinion25. Rose McDermott: Prospect Theory and Risk Assessment26. Carolyn L. Funk: Connecting the Social and Biological Bases of Public Opinion27. William G. Jacoby: Attitude Organization in the Mass Public: The Impact of Ideology and PartisanshipThe Pluralism of Public Opinion28. Laura Stoker and Jackie Bass: Political Socialization: Ongoing Questions and New Directions29. Leonie Huddy and Erin Cassese: On the Complex and Varied Political Effects of Gender30. Frederick C. Harris: The Contours of Black Public Opinion31. Rodolfo O. de la Garza and Seung-Jin Jang: Latino Public Opinion32. Jane Junn, Taeku Lee, S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, and Janelle Wong: Asian American Public Opinion33. Aimee E. Barbeau, Carin Robinson, and Clyde Wilcox: A Vine with Many Branches: Religion and Public Opinion Research (34. Leslie McCall and Jeff Manza: Class Differences in Social and Political Attitudes in the United States35. Vincent Hutchings and Spencer Piston: Knowledge, Sophistication, and Issue PublicsPart IV: Issues and Politics36. Jason Barabas: Public Opinion, the Media, and Economic Well-Being37. Taeku Lee and Nicole Willcoxon: Race, Public Opinion, the Media38. Patrick J. Egan: Public Opinion, the Media, and Social Issues39. Costas Panagopoulos and Robert Y. Shapiro: Big Government and Public OpinionForeign Policy and Security40. Douglas D. Foyle: Public Opinion, Foreign Policy and the Media: Toward an Integrative Theory41. John Mueller: Public Opinion, the Media, and War42. Brigitte L. Nacos and Yaeli Bloch-Elkon: The Media, Public Opinion, and TerrorismV. Democracy Under Stress43. Robert Y. Shapiro and Lawrence R. Jacobs: The Democratic Paradox: The Waning of Popular Sovereignty and the Pathologies of American PoliticsIndex