The Oxford Handbook of Arabic Linguistics

Hardcover | September 24, 2013

byJonathan Owens

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Until about 60 years ago, linguistic research on the Arabic language in the West was restricted to inquiries on Classical Arabic and the Classical tradition, and spoken Arabic dialects, with historical studies embedded within the broader field of Semitic languages. This situation is changingquickly, not only through the continuation of older research traditions, but also with the integration of new research fields and perspectives. With this explanation comes the danger of specialists in Arabic losing an overview of the field, and of leaving non-specialists without basic resourced forevaluating domains of research which they may be interested in for comparative purposes. The Oxford Handbook of Arabic Linguistics will confront this problem by combining state-of-the-art overviews with essays on issues of perspective, controversy, and point of view. In twenty-one chapters, leading experts from around the world will lay out their own stances on controversial issues. Thebook not only evaluates ways in which questions and theories established in general linguistics and its sub-fields elucidate Arabic, but also challenges approaches which might result in accommodating Arabic to "non-Arabic" interpretations, and brings out the Arabic specificity of individualproblems. The Handbook, in one compact volume, gives critical expression to a language which covers large populations and geographical areas, has a long written tradition, and has been the locus of major intellectual fervor and debate.

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Until about 60 years ago, linguistic research on the Arabic language in the West was restricted to inquiries on Classical Arabic and the Classical tradition, and spoken Arabic dialects, with historical studies embedded within the broader field of Semitic languages. This situation is changingquickly, not only through the continuation of...

Jonathan Owens is Professor of Arabic Linguistics at the University of Bayreuth.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:592 pages, 9.75 × 6.75 × 0.98 inPublished:September 24, 2013Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199764131

ISBN - 13:9780199764136

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Table of Contents

1. Jonathan Owens: A house of sound structure, of marvelous form and proportion: An Introduction2. Mohamed Embarki: Phonetics3. Sam Hellmuth: Phonology4. Robert Ratcliffe: Morphology5. Ramzi Baalbaki: Arabic Linguistic TraditionI6. Elabbas Benmamoun and Lina Choueiri: The Syntax of Arabic from a Generative Perspective7. Lutz Edzard: The Philological Approach to Arabic Grammar8. Pierre Larcher: The Arabic Linguistic Tradition II: Beyond Grammar9. Everhard Ditters: Issues in Arabic Computational Linguistics10. Enam Al-Wer: Sociolinguistics11. Yasir Suleiman: Arabic Folk Linguistics: Between Mother-tongue and Native Language12. Clive Holes: Orality, Culture and Language13. Peter Behnstedt and Manfred Woidich: Dialects and Dialectology14. Abdelali Bentahila, Eirlys Davies, and Jonathan Owens: Codeswitching and Codemixing Involving Arabic15. Maarten Kossmann: Borrowing16. Sami Boudelaa: Psycholinguistics17. Karin Ryding: Arabic Second Language Acquisition18. Peter Daniels: The Arabic Writing System19. Jan Rets: What is Arabic?20. Jonathan Owens: History21. Daniel Newman: The Arabic Literary Language: The Nah?a (and Beyond)22. Mauro Tosco and Stefano Manfredi: Creoles and Pidgins23. Solomon Sara: Lexicography in the Classical Era24. Tim Buckwalter and Dilworth Parkinson: Modern Lexicography