The Oxford Handbook of Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration

Hardcover | January 14, 2014

EditorSandra M. Bucerius, Michael Tonry

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Social tensions between majority and minority populations often center on claims that minorities are largely responsible for crime and disorder. Members of some disadvantaged groups in all developed countries, sometimes long-standing residents and other times recent immigrants, experienceunwarranted disparities in their dealings with the criminal justice system. Accusations of unfair treatment by police and courts are common. The Oxford Handbook of Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration provides comprehensive analyses of current knowledge about these and a host of related subjects.Topics include legal and illegal immigration, ethnic and race relations, and discrimination and exclusion, and their links to crime in the United States and elsewhere. Leading scholars from sociology, criminology, law, psychology, geography, and political science document and explore relations amongrace, ethnicity, immigration, and crime. Individual chapters provide in-depth critical overviews of key issues, controversies, and research. Contributors present the historical backdrops of their subjects, describe population characteristics, and summarize relevant data and research findings. Most articles provide synopses of racial,ethnic, immigration, and justice-related concerns and offer policy recommendations and proposals for future research. Some articles are case studies of particular problems in particular places, including juvenile incarceration, homicide, urban violence, social exclusion, and other issuesdisproportionately affecting disadvantaged minority groups. The Oxford Handbook of Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration is the first major effort to examine and synthesize knowledge concerning immigration and crime, ethnicity and crime, and race and crime in one volume, and does so both for the UnitedStates and for many other countries.

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Social tensions between majority and minority populations often center on claims that minorities are largely responsible for crime and disorder. Members of some disadvantaged groups in all developed countries, sometimes long-standing residents and other times recent immigrants, experienceunwarranted disparities in their dealings with t...

Sandra M. Bucerius is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Alberta. Michael Tonry is Professor of Law and Public Policy and Director of the Institute on Crime and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota, and senior fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement in Amsterdam.

other books by Sandra M. Bucerius

Format:HardcoverDimensions:960 pages, 9.75 × 6.75 × 0.98 inPublished:January 14, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199859019

ISBN - 13:9780199859016

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Table of Contents

Michael Tonry and Sandra Bucerius: Introduction on Ethnicity, Crime, and ImmigrationSection 1: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in the United States1. Michael Tonry: Race and Crime in American History2. Douglas S. Massey: The Racialization of Latinos in the United States3. Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver: Race and Crime in American Politics: From Law and Order to Willie Horton and Beyond4. James D. Unnever: Race, Crime, and Public Opinion5. Toya Like-Haislip: Racial and Ethnic Patterns in Criminality and Victimization6. Robin S. Engel and Kristin Swartz: Race, Crime, and Policing7. Cassia Spohn: Racial Disparities in Prosecution, Sentencing, and Punishment8. Jamie Fellner: Race and Drugs9. David J. Harding: Case Study: Living the Drama-Community, Conflict, and Culture among Inner City Boys10. Jodie Miller: Case Study: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered ViolenceSection 2: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in Other Developed Countries11. Akwasi Owusu-Bempah and Scot Wortley: Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice in Canada12. Alpa Parmar: Ethnicity, Racism, and Crime in England and Wales13. Elena Marchetti and Riley Downie: Indigenous People and Sentencing Courts in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada14. Chris Cunneen: Colonial Processes, Indigenous Peoples, and Criminal Justice Systems15. Sveinung Sandberg: Case Study: Black Cannabis Dealers in a White Welfare State: Race, Politics, and Street Capital in Norway16. Sara Thompson: Case Study: Black Homicide Victimization in Toronto, Ontario, CanadaSection 3: Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration in the United States17. Mary C. Waters and Jessica T. Simes: The Politics of Immigration and Crime18. Paul Knepper: Traffickers? Terrorists? Smugglers? Immigrants in the United States and International Crime before the Second World War19. Jacob Stowell and Stephanie Di Pietro: Crimes By and Against Immigrants20. Charis E. Kubrin and Glenn A. Trager: Immigration and Crime in US Communities: Charting Some Promising New Directions in Research21. Luca Berardi and Sandra Bucerius: Immigrants and their Children: Evidence on Generational Differences in Crime22. Ramiro Martinez and Kimberly Mehlman-Orozco: Latino/Hispanic Immigration and Crime23. Jamie Winders: Criminalizing Settlement: The Politics of Immigration in the American South24. Mary Fan: The Law of Immigration and CrimeSection 4: Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration in Other Developed Countries25. Jennifer Hochschild and Colin Brown: Searching (with Minimal Success) for Links among Immigration and Imprisonment26. Sophie Body-Gendrot: Ethnicity, Crime, and Immigration in France27. Ryoko Yamamoto and David Johnson: The Convergence of Control: Immigration and Crime in Contemporary Japan28. Godfried Engbersen, Arjen Leerkes and Erik Snel: Ethnicity, Migration, and Crime in the Netherlands29. Stefania Crocitti: Immigration, Crime, and Criminalization in Italy30. Sebastian Roch, Mirta B. Gordon and Marie-Aude Depuiset: Case Study: Sentencing Violent Juvenile Offenders in Color Blind France: Does Ethnicity Matter?31. Kevin O'Neill: Case Study: Lost and Found: Christianity, Conversion, and Gang Disaffiliation in Guatemala32. Sandra Bucerius: Case Study: Immigration, Social Exclusion, and Informal Economies: Muslim Immigrants in FrankfurtIndex