The Oxford Handbook of Indian Foreign Policy

Hardcover | August 23, 2015

EditorDavid M. Malone, C. Raja Mohan, Srinath Raghavan

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Following the end of the Cold War, the economic reforms in the early 1990s, and ensuing impressive growth rates, India has emerged as a leading voice in global affairs, particularly on international economic issues. Its domestic market is fast-growing and India is becoming increasinglyimportant to global geo-strategic calculations, at a time when it has been outperforming many other growing economies, and is the only Asian country with the heft to counterbalance China. Indeed, so much is India defined internationally by its economic performance (and challenges) that otherdimensions of its internal situation, notably relevant to security, and of its foreign policy have been relatively neglected in the existing literature. This handbook presents an innovative, high profile volume, providing an authoritative and accessible examination and critique of Indian foreign policy. The handbook brings together essays from a global team of leading experts in the field to provide a comprehensive study of the various dimensions ofIndian foreign policy.

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Following the end of the Cold War, the economic reforms in the early 1990s, and ensuing impressive growth rates, India has emerged as a leading voice in global affairs, particularly on international economic issues. Its domestic market is fast-growing and India is becoming increasinglyimportant to global geo-strategic calculations, at ...

David M. Malone joined the United Nations University on 1 March 2013 as its sixth Rector. In that role, he holds the rank of Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations. Prior to joining the United Nations University Dr. David Malone served (2008-2013) as President of Canada's International Development Research Centre, a funding agen...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:768 pages, 9.69 × 6.73 × 1.87 inPublished:August 23, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019874353X

ISBN - 13:9780198743538

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Table of Contents

Section I: Introduction1. David M. Malone, C. Raja Mohan and Srinath Raghavan: India and the World2. Kanti Bajpai: Five Approaches to the Study of Indian Foreign Policy3. Siddhartha Mallavarapu: Theorising India's Foreign RelationsSection II: Evolution of Indian Foreign Policy4. Sneh Mahajan: Foreign Policy of the Raj and its Legacy5. Rahul Sagar: Ideas about Foreign Policy Before Independence6. Pallavi Raghavan: Establishing the Ministry of External Affairs7. Andrew Kennedy: Nehru's Foreign Policy: Idealism and Realism Conjoined?8. Surjit Mansingh: Indira Gandhi's Foreign Policy: Hard Realism?9. Srinath Raghavan: At the Cusp of Transformation: The Rajiv Gandhi Years, 1984-8910. C. Raja Mohan: Foreign Policy After 1990: Transformation Through Incremental Adaptation11. Sumit Ganguly: India's National Security12. Ligia Norohna: Resources13. Rohan Mukherjee: India's International Development Program14. Rani Mullen: India's Soft PowerSection III: Institutions and Actors15. Paul Staniland and Vipin Narang: State and Politics16. Rudra Chaudhuri: The Parliament17. Tanvi Madan: Officialdom18. Rajiv Kumar: The Private Sector19. Manoj Joshi: The Media in the Making of Foreign Policy20. Amitabh Mattoo and Rory Medcalf: Think-Tanks, Universities21. Latha Varadarajan: Mother India and Her Children Abroad: The Role of the Diaspora in India's Foreign Policy22. Devesh Kapur: Public Opinion23. Jaideep A. Prabhu: Indian Scientists in Defence and Foreign Policy24. The Economic Imperatives Shaping India's Foreign PolicySection IV: Geography25. Stephen Cohen: India and the Region26. Alka Acharya: China27. Rajesh Basrur: India's Policy Towards Pakistan28. Krishnan Srinivasan and Sreeradha Dutta: Bangladesh29. S.D. Muni: India's Nepal Policy30. V. Suryanarayan: India-Sri Lanka Equation: Geography as Opportunity31. Emilian Kavalski: India's Bifurcated Look in Central Eurasia: The Central Asian Republics32. Talmiz Ahmad: The Persian Gulf33. Amitava Acharya: India's 'Look East' Policy34. David Scott: The Indian Ocean as India's Ocean: Geopolitics and Geoeconomic Drivers for the 21st CenturySection V: Key Partnerships35. Ashley Tellis: US-India Relations: The Struggle for an Enduring Partnership36. Christian Wagner: Western Europe37. Rajan Menon: The Russian Federation: The Anatomy and Evolution of a Relationship38. Varun Sahni: Brazil: Fellow Traveller on the Long and Winding Road to Grandeza39. P.R. Kumaraswamy: Israel: A Maturing Relationship40. Kudrat Virk: India and South Africa41. Constantino Xavier: Unbreakable Bond: Africa in India's Foreign PolicySection VI: Multilateral Diplomacy42. Poorvi Chitalkar and David M. Malone: India and Global Governance43. Manu Bhagavan: India and the United Nations- or Things Fall Apart44. Jason Kirk: India and the International Financial Institutions45. Samir Saran: India's Contemporary Pluritalerism46. Pradeep S. Mehta and Bipul Chatterjee: India in the International Trading System47. Rajesh Rajagopalan: Multilateralism in India's Nuclear Policy: A Questionable Default Option48. Navroz Dubash and Lavanya Rajamani: Multilateral Diplomacy on Climate ChangeSection VII: Looking Ahead49. Sunil Khilnani: India's Rise: The Search for Wealth and Power in the 21st Century50. Eswaran Sridharan: Rising or Constrained Power? Why India Will Find It Difficult To Convert Economic Growth and Nuclear Capability into Power