The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism by John GrecoThe Oxford Handbook of Skepticism by John Greco

The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism

EditorJohn Greco

Paperback | October 13, 2011

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In the history of philosophical thought, few themes loom as large as skepticism. Skepticism has been the most visible and important part of debates about knowledge. Skepticism at its most basic questions our cognitive achievements, challenges our ability to obtain reliable knowledge; castingdoubt on our attempts to seek and understand the truth about everything from ethics, to other minds, religious belief, and even the underlying structure of matter and reality. Since Descartes, the defense of knowledge against skepticism has been one of the primary tasks not just of epistemology butphilosophy itself.The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism features twenty-six newly commissioned chapters by top figures in the field. Part One contains articles explaining important kinds of skeptical reasoning. Part Two focuses on responses to skeptical arguments. Part Three concentrates on important contemporary issuesrevolving around skepticism. As the first volume of its kind, the articles make significant contributions to the debate on skepticism.
John Greco is Professor and Leonard and Elizabeth Eslick Chair in Philosophy at Saint Louis University
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Title:The Oxford Handbook of SkepticismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:624 pages, 9.61 × 6.69 × 0.68 inPublished:October 13, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199836809

ISBN - 13:9780199836802

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Table of Contents

John Greco: IntroductionPart One. Varieties of Skepticism and Skeptical Arguments1. Markus Lammenranta: The Pyrrhonian Problematic2. Richard Fumerton: The Problem of the Criterion3. Jose Luis Bermudez: Cartesian Skepticism: Arguments and Antecedents4. Michael Williams: Hume's Skepticism5. John Greco: Skepticism about the External World6. Weintraub: Skepticism about Induction7. Robert Audi: Skepticism about A Priori Justification: Self-evidence, Defeasibility, and Cogito Propositions8. Terence Cuneo: Moral Realism, Quasi-Realism and Skepticism9. Paul K. Moser: Religious Skepticism10. Bryan Frances: Live Skeptical HypothesesPart Two. Responses to Skepticism11. George Pappas: Berkeley's Treatment of Skepticism12. Robert Stern: Kant's Response to Skepticism13. James Van Cleve: Reid's Response to Skepticism14. Christopher Hookway: Peirce and Skepticism15. Noah Lemos: Moore's Common Sense Response16. Mark Kaplan: Austin's Way with Skepticism17. Marie McGinn: Wittgentein on Certainty18. Peter J. Graham: Relativism as a Response to SkepticismPart Three. Contemporary Issues19. Stewart Cohen: Ascriber Contextualism20. Duncan Pritchard: Sensitivity, Safety, and Anti-Luck Epistemology21. Jonathan Kvanvig: Closure and Alternative Possibilities22. Peter D. Klein: Contemporary Responses to the Regress Argument23. Michael Bergmann: Externalist Responses to Skepticism24. Jonathan Vogel: Internalist Responses to Skepticism25. Guy Axtell: Virtue-theoretic Responses to Skepticism26. Alan Millar: Disjunctivism and Skepticism