The Oxford University Press: An Informal History by Peter Sutcliffe

The Oxford University Press: An Informal History

byPeter Sutcliffe

Hardcover | January 1, 2002

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Oxford University Press is one of the oldest and best-known publishing houses in the world. This history, originally published to mark 500 years of printing in Oxford, traces the transformation of the Press from a lucrative Bible house into a great national and international publishingbusiness. Great names in the early history of the Press, like Laud, Fell, and Blackstone, laid sound foundations, but as late as 1870 it was thought necessary to remind the Delegates that publishing books was not 'entirely beside their function'. Even in the 1890s there were still those preparedto censure the University for allowing its Press to publish the secular and profane literature of Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare.

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Title:The Oxford University Press: An Informal HistoryFormat:HardcoverDimensions:332 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.95 inPublished:January 1, 2002Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199510849

ISBN - 13:9780199510849

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Table of Contents

Prologue1. 1800-18602. 1860-1884: 'Vigilant Superintendence'3. The Mysterious Affair of Lyttelton Gell4. Caesar and the Alligator5. The Great War6. The Inter-War Years7. The Second World WarEpilogueIndex

From Our Editors

This history of the O.U.P. is published in the year in which the Press celebrates 500 years of printing in Oxford. Great names in the early history of the Press, like Laud, Fell, and Blackstone, laid sound foundations, but as late as 1870 it was thought necessary to remind the Delegates that publishing books was not 'entirely beside their function.'