The Peanut Allergy Epidemic: What's Causing It and How to Stop It

Hardcover | August 18, 2015

byHeather Fraser

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Essential reading for every parent of a child with peanut allergies—third edition with a foreword by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

Why is the peanut allergy an epidemic that only seems to be found in western cultures? More than four million people in the United States alone are affected by peanut allergies, while there are few reported cases in India, a country where peanut is the primary ingredient in many baby food products. Where did this allergy come from, and does medicine play any kind of role in the phenomenon? After her own child had an anaphylactic reaction to peanut butter, historian Heather Fraser decided to discover the answers to these questions.

In The Peanut Allergy Epidemic, Fraser delves into the history of this allergy, trying to understand why it largely develops in children and studying its relationship with social, medical, political, and economic factors. In an international overview of the subject, she compares the epidemic in the United States to sixteen other geographical locations; she finds that in addition to the United States in countries such as Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Sweden, there is a one in fifty chance that a child, especially a male, will develop a peanut allergy. Fraser also highlights alternative medicines and explores issues of vaccine safety and other food allergies.

This third edition features a foreword from Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and a new chapter on promising leads for cures to peanut allergies. The Peanut Allergy Epidemic is a must read for every parent, teacher, and health professional.

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From the Publisher

Essential reading for every parent of a child with peanut allergies—third edition with a foreword by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.Why is the peanut allergy an epidemic that only seems to be found in western cultures? More than four million people in the United States alone are affected by peanut allergies, while there are few reported cases i...

Heather Fraser is a Canadian author, speaker, and natural health advocate and practitioner. She is the mother of a child who suffers from peanut allergies. Fraser lives in Toronto, Canada.Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., is senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, chief prosecuting attorney for the Hudson Riverkeeper, and pres...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.88 inPublished:August 18, 2015Publisher:Skyhorse Publishing Inc.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:163220357X

ISBN - 13:9781632203571

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“Fraser has created a necessary text for anyone concerned with allergies, anaphylaxis, or the rise in life-threatening reactions to peanuts, which has become widespread and epidemic.” —Mark Blaxill, cofounder, Health Choice and the Canary Party; coauthor, Age of Autism“Phenomenal detective work! Heather Fraser weaves history, medicine, and science into a convincing hypothesis to solve a modern medical mystery. The Peanut Allergy Epidemic explains the origins and recent dramatic rise in incidence of peanut allergy in particular, but also provides a context for a wide range of other increasingly common immunological diseases. It should be required reading for pediatricians. I hope it is read by parents and prospective parents everywhere before blindly consenting to prophylactic medical interventions for their children.” —Jamie Deckoff-Jones, MD“May in time come to be recognized as a major landmark in medical history. . . . The author has shown plausible reasons that certain substances in vaccines may be playing a contributory role in many increasingly prevalent childhood health problems.” —Harold E. Buttram, MD“This magnificent book is in a rare class of books that present impeccable scientific evidence in prose that is accessible to the educated lay public, while slowly unfolding a gripping mystery that grabs the reader’s attention all the way through. If Heather Fraser is right about the link between vaccines and peanut allergy, and the evidence speaks for itself, then it opens up the frightening possibility that vaccines play a major role in all the food allergies that beset today’s children.” —Stephanie Seneff, PhD, senior research scientist, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory“In a world where scientific research demands thorough investigation into all causes of the allergy epidemic but one, Heather Fraser stands alone, shining her light on the stones intentionally left unturned for the last quarter of a century.” —Robyn Ross, BS, JD, allergy advocate“[Fraser] masterfully demonstrates how, time and again, bizarre appearance and waning of widespread allergies to certain foods in human populations has followed the introduction and then withdrawal of specific medical formulations delivered by injection . . . The history of clinical and immunologic research illuminated by The Peanut Allergy Epidemic paves the way to finding the cause that will first be vehemently denied, then ridiculed, and finally accepted.” —Tetyana Obukhanych, PhD, author, Vaccine Illusion“A compelling work on a subject that is taboo to the mainstream media.” —Lawrence Solomon, columnist, Financial Post; executive director, Energy Probe