The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth Century by Madelyn DetloffThe Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth Century by Madelyn Detloff

The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth Century

byMadelyn Detloff

Paperback | February 17, 2011

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Modernism is commonly perceived as a response to the cataclysmic events of the early twentieth century. To what extent then can we explain its continued persistence? Madelyn Detloff argues for modernism's relevance to our own age, a time of escalating loss, retribution and desire. Some of the social formations that inspired modernist cultural production - xenophobic nationalism and imperial hubris - are still with us. Writers such as Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein, who saw themselves as outsiders with a precarious sense of belonging to their dominant culture, are, Detloff claims, still able to give us insight into our contemporary narratives of loss, recovery, memory and nation. Detloff extends her conceptualisation to include current writers like Pat Barker and Hanif Kureshi, who have taken up the modernist thread in their own work; the result is an ambitious study that will appeal to all students and scholars of modernism.

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Title:The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth CenturyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:226 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.47 inPublished:February 17, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521182468

ISBN - 13:9780521182461

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Table of Contents

Introduction: 'The captivating spell of the past'; Part I. War, Time, Trauma: 1. Woolf's resilience; 2. Stein's shame; 3. H. D.'s wars; Part II. The Modernist Patch: 4. Pictures, arguments, and empathy; 5. The promise and peril of metic intimacy; 6. Orpheus, AIDS, and The Hours; Epilogue: towards a survivable public mourning.