The Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition And Design For Better Digital Photos by Michael FreemanThe Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition And Design For Better Digital Photos by Michael Freeman

The Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition And Design For Better Digital Photos

byMichael FreemanEditorMichael Freeman

Paperback | September 20, 2013

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Michael Freeman¿s unrivalled compositional advice, first presented in the bestelling The Photographer's Eye, is explained in a new and deliberately visual manner in The Photographer's Eye Graphic Guide. Photography is a visual language in itself, and therefore lends perfectly to visual explanation. Drawing on his long professional experience as an editorial photographer, Michael Freeman shows exactly how images work by using a beguilingly simple technique. His unique style of illustration (which he does himself ) deconstructs photographs in a way that is clear, elegant and thoughtful. The information in this book can be absorbed in minutes, but last you a lifetime.

Michael Freeman is a renowned international photographer and writer who specializes in travel, architecture, and Asian art. He is particularly well known for his expertise in special effects. He has been a leading photographer for the Smithsonian magazine for many years, and has worked for Time-Life Books and Reader's Digest. Michael i...
Title:The Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition And Design For Better Digital PhotosFormat:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 10 × 9.5 × 0.5 inPublished:September 20, 2013Publisher:Taylor and FrancisLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0240824261

ISBN - 13:9780240824260

Customer Reviews of The Photographer's Eye: Graphic Guide: Composition And Design For Better Digital Photos

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from . He guides the reader through composition making process, what to include/exclude to reinforce the visual context, what to look for, using classical rules (ex. rules of third) and then showing compositions with original flair ... I mean there is nothing better then learning from a professional who shoots in a setting that can't be controlled the way one can control things in a studio. You can see there is a lot of planning here even though he does not explicitly talk about that.
Date published: 2017-05-07

Table of Contents

Camera Controls
The Frame
Harmony and Contrast

Subject and Attention

Graphic Elements
Light

Color

Visual Style

Order out of Chaos
Planned Shooting