The Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological Vision by Richard CrossThe Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological Vision by Richard Cross

The Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological Vision

byRichard Cross

Hardcover | September 1, 1998

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Duns Scotus, along with Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham, was one of the three most talented and influential of the medieval schoolmen, and a highly original and creative thinker. Natural philosophy, or physics, is one of the areas of his system which has not received detailed attentionin modern literature. But it is important, both for understanding Scotus's contributions in theology, and in tracing some important developments in the basically Aristotelian world-view which Scotus and his contemporaries espoused. The book contains detailed discussion and analysis of Scotus'saccounts of the nature of matter; the structure of material substance; mass; the nature of space, time, and motion; quantitative and qualitative change; and the various sorts of unity which can be exhibited by different kinds of whole. It also includes discussion of Scotus's accounts ofchemical composition, organic unity, and nutrition. Scotus's views on these matters are philosophyically sophisticated, and often highly original.
Richard Cross is a Tutorial Fellow in Theology at Oriel College, Oxford.
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Title:The Physics of Duns Scotus: The Scientific Context of a Theological VisionFormat:HardcoverPublished:September 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198269749

ISBN - 13:9780198269748

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Editorial Reviews

`Cross's book is extremely dense and rich both exegetically and philosophically. Though his approach is primarily exegetical, Cross also succeeds in showing that many aspects of Scotus physics are of more than historical interest. There is also little doubt that Cross's book greatlycontributes to our knowledge of Aristotelian natural philosophy in the late Middle Ages. It should be read by anyone seriously interested in Scotus and/or medieval physics.'Cecilia Trifogli, Journal of Theological Studies, Vol.51 No.1