The Pixar Touch

Kobo ebook | May 13, 2008

byDavid A. Price

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The Pixar Touch is a lively chronicle of Pixar Animation Studios' history and evolution, and the “fraternity of geeks” who shaped it. With the help of animating genius John Lasseter and visionary businessman Steve Jobs, Pixar has become the gold standard of animated filmmaking, beginning with a short special effects shot made at Lucasfilm in 1982 all the way up through the landmark films Toy Story, Finding Nemo, Wall-E, and others. David A. Price goes behind the scenes of the corporate feuds between Lasseter and his former champion, Jeffrey Katzenberg, as well as between Jobs and Michael Eisner. And finally he explores Pixar's complex relationship with the Walt Disney Company as it transformed itself into the $7.4 billion jewel in the Disney crown.


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From the Publisher

The Pixar Touch is a lively chronicle of Pixar Animation Studios' history and evolution, and the “fraternity of geeks” who shaped it. With the help of animating genius John Lasseter and visionary businessman Steve Jobs, Pixar has become the gold standard of animated filmmaking, beginning with a short special effects shot made at Lucasf...

Format:Kobo ebookPublished:May 13, 2008Publisher:Knopf Doubleday Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307269507

ISBN - 13:9780307269508

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Customer Reviews of The Pixar Touch

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Detailed and enlightening, while incredibly engaging If you have a love for Pixar and a great appreciation for the creativity and work that goes into each film, I would highly recommend this book. Some chapters dive into the nitty-gritty of the animation process and the science behind Ed Catmull's revolutionary computer animation process, however, the book dives into the creation of Pixar and the struggles the company's founders went through. The book also makes you appreciate the amount of work the animators put into a single frame of a film (most recently published, how it takes 12 hours for a Pixar animator to create a strand of Sully's hair for a single frame in Monster's Inc.). You are also wow'ed at the amount of creative thought goes into the storyline and social messages that go into each production. The book also lightly describes the contribution and influence of Steve Jobs, while not taking away the contribution made by John Lassiter, Brad Bird, and others. The book was an incredibly engaging read and deepened my appreciation for the hard work, time, and creativity that goes into a single frame of the Pixar movies we all love.
Date published: 2013-07-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Tremendous read! IMMERSIVE. Interesting. Informative. Chalk full of the right stuff. You'll literally feel as though you've gone through the length and breadth of Pixar's journey, as well as the journeys of other connected individuals. David A. Price somehow boils down an incredibly and surprisingly expansive subject/story into just the right amount of facts/quotes/biographies/histories/and so forth. As a filmmaker and admirer of Pixar, (Walt's) Disney, ILM, and the (r)evolutionary journey of film effects and animation, I found this book to be a tremendous and valuable read. Cheers!
Date published: 2009-05-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very good. The book was interesting kept me wanting to read it; the book tells you how Pixar started out, where a lot of their employees came from and their backgrounds. They tell you how a garage business ended up into a huge multimillion dollars film industry. How they started out, how they managed to continue their learning and advancing the programs in 3-D graphic animation. It also tells us how the government funded their work until they joined with Lucasfilms and after the Star Wars Trilogy they became Pixar Inc, Steve Jobs as there owner and partnering up with Disney. After a few years Disney decided not to be with Pixar, they split. Disney then recognized them Pixar because they brought in 45% of their revenue. Later on a few years later they merge once again. After that they came out with the box office hit Toy Story and since then they’ve been trying to improve the quality of motion pictures and 3-D animations. I have enjoyed this book, which I hope the next reader will also.
Date published: 2009-02-19