The Plain Mans Pathways to Heaven: Kinds of Christianity in Post-Reformation England, 1570-1640

Hardcover | October 1, 2007

byChristopher Haigh

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What did ordinary people believe in post-Reformation England, and what did they do about it? This book looks at religious belief and practice through the eyes of five sorts of people: godly Protestant ministers, zealous Protestant laypeople, the ignorant, those who complained about the burdensof religion, and the Catholics. Based on 600 court and visitation books from three national and twelve local archives, it cites what people had to say about themselves, their religion, and the religions of others. How did people behave in church? What did they think of church rituals? What did they do on Sundays? What did theythink of people of other faiths? How did they get along together, and what sort of issues produced tensions between them? What did parishioners think of their priests and what did the clergy think of their people? Was everyone seriously religious, or did some people mock or doubt religion? If these questions have been tackled before, it has usually been by way of claims about what the common people believed in books written by members of the educated ranks about their contemporaries. In contrast, by going directly to other sources of evidence such court records and parish complaints,this book illuminates what ordinary people actually said and did. Written by one of our leading historians of early modern England, it is a lively and readable account of popular religion in England under Elizabeth I and the early Stuarts, dealing with the results of the Reformation, reactions toofficial policy, and the background to the Civil Wars of the mid-17th century.

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What did ordinary people believe in post-Reformation England, and what did they do about it? This book looks at religious belief and practice through the eyes of five sorts of people: godly Protestant ministers, zealous Protestant laypeople, the ignorant, those who complained about the burdensof religion, and the Catholics. Based on 60...

Christopher Haigh is lecturer in Modern History at the University of Oxford and a tutor at Christ Church. He has published widely on religion in Reformation and post-Reformation England, including English Reformations, a controversial work that established him as one of the leading historians of early modern England. For much of his c...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:266 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.79 inPublished:October 1, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199216509

ISBN - 13:9780199216505

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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Plain Man in Characters and Court BooksPart I: 'Theologus, a divine': the preacher and his people1. Preacher of the word2. Pastor of a flockPart II: 'Asunetus, an ignorant man': knowledge and neglect3. Ignorance is bliss4. Why all the fuss?Part III: Philagathus, an honest man': the professors and the profane5. Godly living6. The godly and the restPart IV: 'Antilegon, a caviller': liberty and laughter7. Attitudes to authority8. Scoffing at the sacredPart V: Popery and other enemies9. The Papist: outside the church, inside the community10. Enemies of the godlyConclusion: Pathways to HeavenNotesSources