The Political Economy of Managed Migration: Nonstate Actors, Europeanization, and the Politics of…

Paperback | January 1, 2011

byGeorg Menz

not yet rated|write a review
European governments have re-discovered labour migration, but are eager to be perceived as controlling unsolicited forms of migration, especially through asylum and family reunion. The emerging paradigm of managed migration combines the construction of more permissive channels for desirableand actively recruited labour migrants with ever more restrictive approaches towards asylum seekers. Non-state actors, especially employer organizations, trade unions, and humanitarian non-governmental organisations, attempt to shape regulatory measures, but their success varies depending onorganizational characteristics. Labour market interest associations' lobbying strategies regarding quantities and skill profile of labour migrants will be influenced by the respective system of political economy they are embedded in. Trade unions are generally supportive of well-managed labourrecruitment strategies. But migration policy-making also proceeds at the European Union (EU) level. While national actors seek to upload their national model as a blueprint for future EU policy to avoid costly adaptation, top-down Europeanization is re-casting national regulation in important ways, notwithstanding highlydivergent national regulatory philosophies. Based on field work in and analysis of primary documents from six European countries (France, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland, Germany, and Poland) this book makes an important contribution to the study of a rapidly Europeanized policy domain. Combininginsights from the literature on comparative political economy, Europeanization, and migration studies, the book makes important contributions to all three, while demonstrating how migration policy can be fruitfully studied by employing tools from mainstream political science, rather than treating itas a distinct subfield.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$61.95

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

European governments have re-discovered labour migration, but are eager to be perceived as controlling unsolicited forms of migration, especially through asylum and family reunion. The emerging paradigm of managed migration combines the construction of more permissive channels for desirableand actively recruited labour migrants with ev...

Georg Menz is Senior Lecturer in Political Economy at Goldsmiths College, London. He has served as Chateaubriand Fellow at the National Foundation for Political Science in Paris, as DAAD Fellow at Humboldt Universitat Berlin and Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute. He is the author of Varieties of Capitalism and Eu...

other books by Georg Menz

Social Policy and the Eurocrisis: Quo Vadis Social Europe
Social Policy and the Eurocrisis: Quo Vadis Social Euro...

Kobo ebook|Oct 12 2015

$96.29 online$124.94list price(save 22%)
Redefining European Economic Governance
Redefining European Economic Governance

Kobo ebook|Apr 14 2016

$209.97

Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.68 inPublished:January 1, 2011Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199593299

ISBN - 13:9780199593293

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Political Economy of Managed Migration: Nonstate Actors, Europeanization, and the Politics of Designing Migration Policies

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

1. Managing Migration: Political Economies, Non-State Actors and Multiple Arenas2. Legacies of the Past and Currents of Change: Conundrums over Migration and Asylum3. National Actors and European Solutions: The Contours of Conflict4. Political Battles at Home and in Brussels: Labor migration and Asylum Policy in Established Countries of Immigration: France, the United Kingdom and Germany5. Contested Areas of Sovereignty: Labor Migration and Asylum Policy in New Countries of Immigration: Ireland, Italy, and Poland6. Managed Migration, Populism and Pragmatism