The Politics and Poetics of Journalistic Narrative by Phyllis FrusThe Politics and Poetics of Journalistic Narrative by Phyllis Frus

The Politics and Poetics of Journalistic Narrative

byPhyllis Frus

Paperback | March 12, 2009

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.72

Earn 259 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Early in the twentieth century, journalism and fiction suffered a forced separation as a result of two coinciding trends: a popular tendency to treat literature as an elevated, aesthetic category and the emergence of objective narrative in journalism. The effect of these two forces was to distance the subject of the narrative from its object, an estrangement later challenged by the writing of New Journalists and nonfiction novelists. In her book Frus recovers and renegotiates the process of writerly creation, and proves that, ultimately, the observer is implicated in the means of observation.
Title:The Politics and Poetics of Journalistic NarrativeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:March 12, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052110274X

ISBN - 13:9780521102742

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Politics and Poetics of Journalistic Narrative

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface: True stories; Acknowledgements; Introduction: What Isn't Literature; 1. Writing after the fact: Crane, journalism and fiction; 2. 'News that stays': Hemingway, journalism and objectivity in fiction; 3. News that fits: The construction of journalistic objectivity; 4. Other American New Journalisms: 1960s New Journalism as 'other'; 5. The 'incredibility of reality' and the ideology of form; 6. Freud and our 'Wolfe Man': The Right Stuff and the concept of belatedness; Conclusion; Notes; Works cited; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Anyone concerned with the media--print, film, television, or others--should welcome Frus's serious inquiry into liminal areas of representation." David Halliburton, American Literature