The Politics of Party Funding: State Funding to Political Parties and Party Competition in Western…

Hardcover | December 4, 2010

byMichael Koss

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Recently there has been a convergence of party funding regimes across many states of Western Europe. The driving force behind this process has been the introduction of state funding to political parties. This book subsequently asks why state funding to political parties has been introduced inever more countries and yet there still remain some places where it has only been introduced to a decidedly limited degree? It argues that a consensus of the relevant parties is a prerequisite for the introduction of state funding, thereby assuming a nexus between particular forms of partycompetition and the outcome of party funding reforms.The author shows how the introduction of state funding is more likely to occur in countries where parties have a high number of institutional veto points at their disposal, where both policy- and office-seeking play a more important role in parties' strategic preferences than vote-seeking, and wherethe discourse on political corruption identifies state funding as a remedy against corrupt practices. These assumptions are confirmed for four cases: Germany, Sweden, the UK, and France. He argues that two constellations of independent variables facilitate the introduction or reform of statesubsidies. On the one hand, in political systems that provide parties with a considerable number of veto points, vote-seeking generally plays a minor role in decisions about party funding. On the other hand parties can reach a consensus independently of the institutional environment and theirstrategic preferences by engaging in the discourse on political corruption.Decreasing levels of ideological polarisation prior to the introduction of state funding imply that causal mechanisms similar to the ones identified in the four case studies are at work in established democracies in Western Europe more generally. Thus, the book represents a first step towards atheory which explains differences and similarities in party funding regimes.

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Recently there has been a convergence of party funding regimes across many states of Western Europe. The driving force behind this process has been the introduction of state funding to political parties. This book subsequently asks why state funding to political parties has been introduced inever more countries and yet there still rema...

Michael Koss studied Political Science, History, and Public Law in Gottingen, Besancon, and Uppsala. He received his PhD in 2008. Alongside his PhD, he worked on two research projects funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) on the German Left Party and the regulation of personal information in comparative perspective...

other books by Michael Koss

Left Party In Contemporary German Politics
Left Party In Contemporary German Politics

Hardcover|Oct 15 2007

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.1 inPublished:December 4, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199572755

ISBN - 13:9780199572755

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Table of Contents

List of figures and tablesList of abbreviations1. Introduction: State Funding to Political Parties and the Convergence of Party Funding RegimesPart I Conceptual Framework2. The Comparative Analysis of Party Funding Regimes3. The Introduction of State Funding to Political Parties from a New Institutionalist Perspective4. The Relationship between Party Funding and Party CompetitionPart II The Party Systems and Party Funding Regimes in Comparative Perspective5. The Party Systems6. The Party Funding RegimesPart III Case Studies7. Germany: The Common Interest in Consensual Politics8. Sweden: The Institutionally Invoked Consensus9. Britain: A Growing Conflict Between Party Goals and Societal Norms With (Still) No Consequences10. France: When The Conflict Between Party Goals and Societal Norms Has Consequences11. Conclusion: The Determinants of Party Funding RegimesReferencesIndex