The Politics of Sensibility: Race, Gender and Commerce in the Sentimental Novel by Markman EllisThe Politics of Sensibility: Race, Gender and Commerce in the Sentimental Novel by Markman Ellis

The Politics of Sensibility: Race, Gender and Commerce in the Sentimental Novel

byMarkman EllisEditorJames Chandler, Marilyn Butler

Paperback | July 29, 2004

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The sentimental novel has long been noted for its liberal and humanitarian interests. In The Politics of Sensibility Markman Ellis argues that sentimental fiction also consciously participated in specific political controversies of the late eighteenth century, including emerging arguments about the ethics of slavery, the morality of commerce, and the movement to reform prostitutes. He shows that sentimental fiction was a public as well as a private genre, and that the very form of the novel was recognized as a political tool of cultural significance.
Title:The Politics of Sensibility: Race, Gender and Commerce in the Sentimental NovelFormat:PaperbackDimensions:280 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:July 29, 2004Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521604273

ISBN - 13:9780521604277

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Table of Contents

1. Sensibility, history and the novel; 2. 'The house of bondage': sentimentalism and the problem of slavery; 3. 'Delight in misery': sentimentalism, amelioration and slavery; 4. 'An easy, speedy and universal medium': canals, commerce and virtue; 5. 'Recovering the path of virtue': the politics of prostitution and the sentimental novel; 6. 'The dangerous tendency of novels' and the controversy of sentimentalism.

Editorial Reviews

"The Politics of Sensibility is successful within its scope....Ellis provides a practical book which will be useful to anyone working on the politics of the early novel." Jack Lynch, Novel