The Politics of Telecommunications: National Institutions, Convergences, and Change in Britain and…

Hardcover | January 15, 2000

byMark Thatcher

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This book confronts some of the most important questions related to liberalization, regulation, and the role of the nation state in an increasingly international economy. In the face of powerful transitional pressures for change, to what extent are states able to maintain stable institutionalframeworks? Do different domestic structures generate dissimilar patterns of policy-making and economic performance? How important are past institutional choices to subsequent reform? The author addresses these questions through a study of the transformations of a strategic economic sector,telecommunications, in Britain and France over the past three decades. It analyses the theoretical strengths and weaknesses of various models of public policy formation and, the role and reform of national institutions and the continuing role of the nation state.

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This book confronts some of the most important questions related to liberalization, regulation, and the role of the nation state in an increasingly international economy. In the face of powerful transitional pressures for change, to what extent are states able to maintain stable institutionalframeworks? Do different domestic structures...

Mark Thatcher is Lecturer in Public Administration and Public Policy, Department of Government, London School of Economics.

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Format:HardcoverPublished:January 15, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198280742

ISBN - 13:9780198280743

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. National Institutions, Differences, Stability and Change2The roots of history: telecommunications in Britain and France before 19693 Technological and economic pressures for change in telecommunications from the 1960s to the 1990s4 Pressures for change from the international regulatory environment of telecommunications from the 1960s to the 1990sPart Two Institutions and policy making 1969-19795The institutional framework of telecommunications in Britain and France 1969-1979: divergence, reform and standstill6 Policy making in the 1970s: constraints in Britain, boldness in FrancePart Three Institutions and policy making 1980-19967 The institutional framework of telecommunications 1980-1997: national change, divergence and differences8The impacts of institutional divergence: the network operators in Britain and France during the 1980s9 Competition in network operation 1990-1996: differing national paths away from monopoly10 Policy making in a new field of telecommunications: advanced networks and services and customer premises equipment from the late 1970s to the mid-1990sPart Four Economic Outcomes11 Economic outcomes in the telecommunications sector in Britain and France 1970-1997: convergence despite institutional divergencePart Five Conclusions12 Conclusion: National Institutions, Policy and Change

Editorial Reviews

`Mark Thatcher's extremely thorough assessment of The Politics of Telecommunication in Britain and France has all the exemplary qualities of the doctoral thesis from which it originated. It is well-written and clearly argued, with scrupulous attention to ensure the accuracy of technicaldetail, supported by original information culled from his numerous interviews, supplemented by a comprehensive range of secondary sources.'Government and Opposition, Vol.36, No.1