The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640-1770: POWER OF THE PASSIVE SELF IN E by Scott Paul GordonThe Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640-1770: POWER OF THE PASSIVE SELF IN E by Scott Paul Gordon

The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640-1770: POWER OF THE PASSIVE SELF IN E

byScott Paul Gordon

Paperback | November 3, 2005

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Challenging recent work contending that seventeenth-century English discourses privilege the notion of a self-enclosed, self-sufficient individual, this study recovers a counter-tradition that imagines selves as more passively prompted than actively choosing. Gordon traces the origins of such ideas of passivity from their roots in the non-conformist religious tradition to their flowering in one of the central texts of eighteenth-century literature, Samuel Richardson's Clarissa.
Scott Paul Gordon is an Associate Professor of English at Lehigh University. He has published numerous articles on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century subjects.
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Title:The Power of the Passive Self in English Literature, 1640-1770: POWER OF THE PASSIVE SELF IN EFormat:PaperbackDimensions:292 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:November 3, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021847

ISBN - 13:9780521021845

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Table of Contents

Introduction: 'spring and motive of our actions', disinterest and self-interest; 1. 'Acted by another': agency and action in early modern England; 2. 'The belief of the people': Thomas Hobbes and the battle over the heroic; 3. 'For want of some heedfull Eye': Mr Spectator and the power of spectacle; 4. 'For its own sake': virtue and agency in early eighteenth-century England; 5. 'Not perform'd at all': managing Garrick's body in eighteenth-century England; 6. 'I wrote my heart': Richardson's Clarissa and the tactics of sentiment; Epilogue: 'A sign of so noble a passion': the politics of disinterested selves; Bibliography.

Editorial Reviews

"The Power of the Passive Self is an impressive and original book that makes an important contribution to current scholarship on the origins of the modern individual." Eighteenth-Century Fiction