The Praetorship in the Roman Republic: Volume 2: 122 to 49 BC: Praetorship In The Roman Repub

Hardcover | December 31, 2000

byT. Corey Brennan

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Brennan's book surveys the history of the Roman praetorship, which was one of the most enduring Roman political institutions, occupying the practical center of Roman Republican administrative life for over three centuries. The study addresses political, social, military and legal history, aswell as Roman religion. Volume I begins with a survey of Roman (and modern) views on the development of legitimate power--from the kings, through the early chief magistrates, and down through the creation and early years of the praetorship. Volume II discusses how the introduction in 122 of C.Gracchus' provincia repetundarum pushed the old city-state system to its functional limits.

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Brennan's book surveys the history of the Roman praetorship, which was one of the most enduring Roman political institutions, occupying the practical center of Roman Republican administrative life for over three centuries. The study addresses political, social, military and legal history, aswell as Roman religion. Volume I begins with ...

T. Corey Brennan is at Bryn Mawr College.

other books by T. Corey Brennan

Format:HardcoverDimensions:880 pages, 6.42 × 9.02 × 1.69 inPublished:December 31, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195114604

ISBN - 13:9780195114607

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"The list of topics is enormous, the accumulated detailed scholarship stunning. There is no doubt that Brennan's massive study is a necessary addition to the library of every professional historian of Rome and will be employed by scholars as the standard work on the praetorship for decades tocome."--American Historical Review