The Presocratics and the Supernatural: Magic, Philosophy and Science in Early Greece by Andrew GregoryThe Presocratics and the Supernatural: Magic, Philosophy and Science in Early Greece by Andrew Gregory

The Presocratics and the Supernatural: Magic, Philosophy and Science in Early Greece

byAndrew Gregory

Paperback | April 23, 2015

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This book examines the relationship between magic, philosophy and the investigation of nature in presocratic Greece. Did the presocratic thinkers, often praised for their rejection of the supernatural, still believe in gods and the divine and the efficacy of magical practices? Did they use animism, astrology, numerology and mysticism in their explanations of the world? This book analyses the evidence in detail and argues that we need to look at each of these beliefs in context.
Andrew Gregory is Reader in History of Science in the Department of Science and Technology Studies, University College London, UK. He is the author of many books on the science of the ancient world, including Plato's Philosophy of Science and Ancient Greek Cosmogony.
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Title:The Presocratics and the Supernatural: Magic, Philosophy and Science in Early GreeceFormat:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:April 23, 2015Publisher:BloomsburyLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1474234771

ISBN - 13:9781474234771

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Table of Contents

Introduction Natural and Supernatural The Literary and Philosophical Background Magic and Its Practice in Presocratic Greece Milesian Pantheism Xenophanes and the Drive Towards a Unitary God The Hippocratics and the Sacred Disease Empedocles The Pythagoreans Leucippus and Democritus Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index

Editorial Reviews

Overall, Gregory provides a thorough introduction to the debates on Presocratic naturalism. He successfully shows that, in many instances, what may seem at first glance to be supernatural was actually carefully integrated into a naturalist conception of the world. His inclusive approach should be particularly invaluable for those who have not yet ventured beyond the confines of the standard philosophical canon.