The Press On Trial: Crimes And Trials As Media Events

Hardcover | August 1, 1997

EditorLloyd Chiasson

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Perhaps no drama catches the interest of the American public more than a spectacular trial. Even though the reporting of a crime may quickly diminish in news value, the trial lingers while drama builds. Although this has become seemingly more pronounced in recent years with the popularity of televised trials, public interest in criminal trials was just as high in 1735 when John Peter Zenger defended his right to free speech, or in 1893 when Lizzie Borden was tried for the murder of her father and stepmother. This book tells the stories of sixteen significant trials in American history and their media coverage, from the Zenger trial in 1735 to the O. J. Simpson trial in 1995. Each chapter relates the history of events leading up to the trial, the people involved, and how the crimes and subsequent trials were reported.

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Perhaps no drama catches the interest of the American public more than a spectacular trial. Even though the reporting of a crime may quickly diminish in news value, the trial lingers while drama builds. Although this has become seemingly more pronounced in recent years with the popularity of televised trials, public interest in crimina...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 9.57 × 6.37 × 1 inPublished:August 1, 1997Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313300224

ISBN - 13:9780313300226

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"Collectively, these authors have produced a new volume that contributes to the literature in the field and adds to the conversation about the influence of the news media on public perceptions of crimes and trials....[I]t is a useful reference and would be a good "reader" in appropraite courses."-Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly