The Princesse de Cl`eves: with `The Princesse de Montpensier and `The Comtesse de Tende by Madame de LafayetteThe Princesse de Cl`eves: with `The Princesse de Montpensier and `The Comtesse de Tende by Madame de Lafayette

The Princesse de Cl`eves: with `The Princesse de Montpensier and `The Comtesse de Tende

byMadame de LafayetteTranslated byTerence Cave

Paperback | September 15, 2008

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Poised between the fading world of chivalric romance and a new psychological realism, Madame de Lafayette's novel of passion and self-deception marks a turning point in the history of the novel. When it first appeared - anonymously - in 1678 in the heyday of French classicism, it arousedfierce controversy among critics and readers, in particular for the extraordinary confession which forms the climax of the story. Having long been considered a classic, it is now regarded as a landmark in the history of women's writing. In this entirely new translation, The Princesse de Cleves is accompanied by two shorter works also attributed to Mme de Lafayette, The Princesse de Montpensier and The Comtesse de Tende; the Introduction and ample notes take account of the latest critical and scholarly work.
Terence Cave is a Professor of French Literature, University of Oxford; and Fellow at St John's College, Oxford.
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Title:The Princesse de Cl`eves: with `The Princesse de Montpensier and `The Comtesse de TendeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 0.59 inPublished:September 15, 2008Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199539170

ISBN - 13:9780199539178

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Editorial Reviews

'His well-judged introduction and his notes are angled towards a student readership ... He also, and this gives his translation a definite edge, includes two important shorter stories by Madame de Lafayette. His translation offers a fair equivalent of Lafayette's careful, often knotty,phrasing, which plunges the reader into the perpexities of amorous feeling and moral choice.'Times Literary Supplement