The Principles Of English Grammar; Comprising The Substance Of The Most Approved English Grammars…

Paperback | July 9, 2012

byPeter Bullions

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...exertion in our power for the puhlic good, we only discharge our duty. 575. Rule XXVI. Two negatives in the samn sentence are improper, unless we mean to affirm; thus, " I cannot hy no means allow it," should he. " I cannot hy any means allow it." Or, " I can hy no means allow it." The reason of this rule is, that one negative destroys another, or is equivalent to an affirmative. Ohs. Sometimes two negatives are intended to affirm, and in this case, if one of them, such as rfw-, in-, t'm-, w»-, &c. is prefixed to another word, a pleasing and delicate variety of expression is produced; as, " Nor was the king unacquainted with his designs,"!.e. he "was acquainted with them." In such sentences the ntervention of only, which is equivalent to a distinct clause, preserves the nega-ion; as, " He was not only illiheral, hut he was covetous." But'f the negative onsist of two separate and detached words, the expression is generally harsh and neleganl; as, Nor have I no money which I can spare, i. c. I have money which can spare. JWe. The English language in this respect agrees with the Latin, hut differs from the Greek and French, in hoth of which two negatives with the same suh icct render the negation stronger. EXERCISES. I cannot drink no more. He cannot do nothing. He will never he no taller. Covet neither riches nor honours, nor no such perishing things. Do not interrupt me thyself, nor let no one disturh me. I am resolved not to comply with the proposal, neither at present nor at any other time. I have received no information on the suhject, neither from him nor from his friend. There cannot he nothing more insignificant than vanity. Nor is danger apprehended in such a government, no more than we commonly apprehend danger from thunder or...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...exertion in our power for the puhlic good, we only discharge our duty. 575. Rule XXVI. Two negatives in the samn senten...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:78 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.16 inPublished:July 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217766951

ISBN - 13:9780217766951

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