The Printed Book: Its History, Illustration and Adornment, from the Days of Gutenberg to the Present Time by Henri Bouchot

The Printed Book: Its History, Illustration and Adornment, from the Days of Gutenberg to the…

byHenri Bouchot, Edward C. Bigmore, Translator

Kobo ebook | February 14, 2014

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The Printed Book
Its History, Illustration and Adornment, from the Days of Gutenberg to the Present Time

This edition features
• illustrations
• a linked Table of Contents and Index

CONTENTS
CHAPTER I.
14.. TO 1462
Origin of the Book—Engravers in relief—The St. Christopher of 1423—Origin of the Xylographs—The Xylographs, Donatus, and Speculum—The Laurent Coster legend—From block books to movable characters—John Gaensefleisch, called Gutenberg—The Strasbourg trial—Gutenberg at Mayence—Fust and Schoeffer—The letters of indulgence—The Bible—The "Catholicon"—The Mayence Bible—Causes of the dispersion of the first Mayence printers—General considerations.
CHAPTER II.
1462 TO 1500
The Book and the printers of the second generation—The German workmen dispersed through Europe—Caxton and the introduction of printing into England—Nicholas Jenson and his supposed mission to Mayence—The first printing in Paris; William Fichet and John Heinlein—The first French printers; their installation at the Sorbonne and their publications—The movement in France—The illustration of the Book commenced in Italy—The Book in Italy; engraving in relief and metal plates—The Book in Germany: Cologne, Nuremberg, Basle—The Book in the Low Countries—French schools of[vi] ornament of the Book; Books of Hours; booksellers at the end of the fifteenth century—Literary taste in titles in France at the end of the fifteenth century—Printers and booksellers' marks—The appearance of the portrait in the Book—Progress in England—Caxton and his followers.
CHAPTER III.
1500 TO 1600
French epics and the Renaissance—Venice and Aldus Manutius—Italian illustrators—The Germans; Theuerdanck, Schaufelein—The Book in other countries—French books at the beginning of the century, before the accession of Francis I.—Geoffroy Tory and his works—Francis I. and the Book—Robert Estienne—Lyons a centre of bookselling; Holbein's Dances of Death—School of Basle—Alciati's emblems and the illustrated books of the middle of the century—The school of Fontainebleau and its influence—Solomon Bernard—Cornelis de la Haye and the Promptuaire—John Cousin—Copper plate engraving and metal plates—Woériot—The portrait in the Book of the sixteenth century—How a book was illustrated on wood at the end of the century—Influence of Plantin on the Book; his school of engravers—General considerations—Progress in England—Coverdale's Bible—English printers and their work—Engraved plates in English books.
CHAPTER IV.
1600 TO 1700
Tendencies of the regency of Marie de Medicis—Thomas de Leu and Leonard Gaultier—J. Picart and Claude Mellan—Lyons and J. de Fornazeris—The Book at the beginning of the seventeenth century in Germany, Italy, and Holland—Crispin Pass in France—The Elzevirs and their work in Holland—Sebastian Cramoisy and the Imprimerie Royale—Illustration with Callot, Della Bella, and Abraham Bosse—The publishers and the Hotel de Rambouillet—The reign of[vii] Louis XIV.; Antoine Vitré syndic at his accession—His works and mortifications; the Polyglot Bible of Le Jay—Art and illustrators of the grand century—Sébastien Leclerc, Lepautre, and Chauveau—Leclerc preparing the illustration and decoration of the Book for the eighteenth century—The Book in England in the seventeenth century.
CHAPTER V.
THE BOOK IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
The regency—Publishers at the beginning of the eighteenth century—Illustrators in France; Gillot—The school of Watteau and Boucher—Cars—The younger Cochin; his principal works in vignettes—French art in England; Gravelot—Eisen—Choffard—The Baisers of Dorat; the Contes of La Fontaine—The publisher Cazin and the special literature of the eighteenth century—The younger Moreau and his illustrations—The Revolution—The school of David—Duplessis-Bertaux—The Book in Germany; Chodowiecki—In England; Boydell and French artists—Caslon and Baskerville—English books with illustrations—Wood engraving in the eighteenth century; the Papillons—Printing offices in the eighteenth century.
CHAPTER VI.
THE BOOK IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
The Didots and their improvements—The folio Racine—The school of Didot—Fine publications in England and Germany—Literature and art of the Restoration—Romanticism—Wood engraving—Bewick's pupils, Clennell, etc.—The illustrators of romances—The generation of 1840—The Book in our days in Europe and America.
CHAPTER VII.
TYPES, IMPRESSION, PAPER, INK
CHAPTER VIII.
BOOKBINDING
The binding of the first printed books—Ancient German bindings—Binding in the time of Louis XII.—Italian bindings—Aldus—Maioli—Grolier—Francis I.—Henry II. and Diane de Poitiers—Catherine de Medicis—Henry III.—The Eves—The "fanfares"—Louis XIII.—Le Gascon—Florimond Badier—Louis XIV.—Morocco leathers—Cramoisy—The bindings of the time of Louis XIV.—The regency—Pasdeloup—The Deromes—Dubuisson—Thouvenin—Lesné—The nineteenth century—English binders—Roger Payne—Francis Bedford.
CHAPTER IX.
LIBRARIES
INDEX

Title:The Printed Book: Its History, Illustration and Adornment, from the Days of Gutenberg to the…Format:Kobo ebookPublished:February 14, 2014Publisher:VolumesOfValueLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990044026207

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