The Prioresses tale, Sire Thopas, the Monkes tale, the Clerkes tale, the Squieres tale, from the…

by Geoffrey Chaucer

General Books LLC | May 5, 2014 | Trade Paperback

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...Ne neuer hadde I thing so leef, ne leuer, As him, god wot! ne neuer shal namo. This lasteth lenger than a yeer or two, That I supposed of him nought but good. 575 But fynally, thus atte laste it stood, That fortune wolde that he moste twinne Out of that place which that I was inne. Wher me was wo, that is no questioun; I can nat make of it discripcioun; 580 For o thing dar I tellen boldely,. I knowe what is the peyne of deth ther-by; Swich harm I felte for he ne myghte bileue. So on a day of me he took his leue, So sorwefully eek, that I wende verraily 585 That he had felt as muche harm as I, Whan that I herde him speke, and sey his hewe. But natheles, I thoughte he was so trewe, And eek that he repaire sholde ageyn With-inne a litel whyle, soth to seyn; 590 And reson wolde eek that he moste go For his honour, as ofte it happeth so, That I made vertu of necessitee, And took it wel, sin that it moste be. As I best myghte, I hidde fro him my sorwe, 595 And took him by the hond, seint lohn to borwe, 1 E. has I; the rest he. And seyde him thus: "lo, I am youres al; Beth swich as I to yow haue ben, and shal." What he answerde it nedeth nat reherce, Who can seyn bet than he, who can do verse? 600 Whan he hath al wel seyd, thanne hath he doon. "Therfor bihoueth him 2 a ful long spoon That shal ete with a feend," thus herde I seye. So atte laste he moste forth his weye, And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste. 605 Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste, I trowe he hadde thilke text in mynde, That "alle thing, repeiring to his kynde, Gladeth him-self"; thus seyn men, as I gesse; Men louen of propre kynde newfangelnesse, 610 As briddes doon that men in cages fede. For though thou nyght and day take of hem hede,...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 120 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.25 in

Published: May 5, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1231100613

ISBN - 13: 9781231100615

Found in: History

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The Prioresses tale, Sire Thopas, the Monkes tale, the Clerkes tale, the Squieres tale, from the Canterbury tales Volume 2

The Prioresses tale, Sire Thopas, the Monkes tale, the Clerkes tale, the Squieres tale, from the…

by Geoffrey Chaucer

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 120 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.25 in

Published: May 5, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1231100613

ISBN - 13: 9781231100615

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...Ne neuer hadde I thing so leef, ne leuer, As him, god wot! ne neuer shal namo. This lasteth lenger than a yeer or two, That I supposed of him nought but good. 575 But fynally, thus atte laste it stood, That fortune wolde that he moste twinne Out of that place which that I was inne. Wher me was wo, that is no questioun; I can nat make of it discripcioun; 580 For o thing dar I tellen boldely,. I knowe what is the peyne of deth ther-by; Swich harm I felte for he ne myghte bileue. So on a day of me he took his leue, So sorwefully eek, that I wende verraily 585 That he had felt as muche harm as I, Whan that I herde him speke, and sey his hewe. But natheles, I thoughte he was so trewe, And eek that he repaire sholde ageyn With-inne a litel whyle, soth to seyn; 590 And reson wolde eek that he moste go For his honour, as ofte it happeth so, That I made vertu of necessitee, And took it wel, sin that it moste be. As I best myghte, I hidde fro him my sorwe, 595 And took him by the hond, seint lohn to borwe, 1 E. has I; the rest he. And seyde him thus: "lo, I am youres al; Beth swich as I to yow haue ben, and shal." What he answerde it nedeth nat reherce, Who can seyn bet than he, who can do verse? 600 Whan he hath al wel seyd, thanne hath he doon. "Therfor bihoueth him 2 a ful long spoon That shal ete with a feend," thus herde I seye. So atte laste he moste forth his weye, And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste. 605 Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste, I trowe he hadde thilke text in mynde, That "alle thing, repeiring to his kynde, Gladeth him-self"; thus seyn men, as I gesse; Men louen of propre kynde newfangelnesse, 610 As briddes doon that men in cages fede. For though thou nyght and day take of hem hede,...